The Gospel on the Margins: The Reception of Mark in the Second Century

Front Cover
Augsburg Fortress Publishers, 2015 - Religion - 400 pages
0 Reviews
Scholars of the Gospel of Mark usually discuss the merits of patristic references to the Gospel's origin and Mark's identity as the “interpreter” of Peter. But while the question of the Gospel's historical origins draws attention, no one has asked why, despite virtually unanimous patristic association of the Gospel with Peter, one of the most prestigious apostolic founding figures in Christian memory, Mark's Gospel was mostly neglected by those same writers. Not only is the text of Mark the least represented of the canonical Gospels in patristic citations, commentaries, and manuscripts, but the explicit comments about the Evangelist reveal ambivalence about Mark's literary or theological value. Michael J. Kok surveys the second-century reception of Mark, from Papias of Hierapolis to Clement of Alexandria, and finds that the patristic writers were hesitant to embrace Mark because they perceived it to be too easily adapted to rival Christian factions. Kok describes the story of Mark's Petrine origins as a second-century move to assert ownership of the Gospel on the part of the emerging Orthodox Church. (Publisher).
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
The Construction of Mark as the Interpreter of Peter
17
The Decline of the Patristic Consensus
19
The Reemergence of the Patristic Tradition
57
From Pauls Fellow Worker to Peters Interpreter
107
The Ideological Function of the Patristic Tradition
161
Toward a Theory of the Patristic Reception of Mark
163
The Gospel on the Margins of the Canon
185
The Clash of Rival Interpreters
229
The Centrist Christian Appropriation of Mark
267
The Carpocratians and the Mystic Gospel of Mark
271
Bibliography
301
Index of Subjects and Modern Authors
329
Index of Ancient Sources
347
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2015)

Michael J. Kok received his PhD in biblical studies at the University of Sheffield under the direction of James Crossley.

Bibliographic information