The Grasslands of the United States: An Environmental History

Front Cover
ABC-CLIO, 2007 - History - 389 pages

"Treeless, level, and semi-arid." Walter Prescott Webb's famous description of the Great Plains is really only part of their story. From their creation at the end of the Ice Age to the ongoing problems of depopulation, soil erosion, polluted streams, and depleted groundwater aquifers, human interaction with the prairies has often been controversial.

Part of ABC-CLIO's Nature and Human Societies series, The Grasslands of the United States: An Environmental History explores the historical and ecological dimensions of human interaction with North America's grasslands. Examining issues as diverse as whether the arrival of the Paleo-Indians led to the extinction of the mammoth and the consequences of industrialization and genetically modified crops, this invaluable reference synthesizes literature from a wide range of authoritative sources to provide a fascinating guide to the environment of this biome.

 

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Contents

1 THE EMERGENCE OF GRASSLAND RELATIONSHIPS PRE1500 CE
1
2 THE UNRAVELING OF THE WILD GRASSLANDS
31
3 THE URBANIZED AND DOMESTICATED GRASSLANDS
73
4 THE MOST ENDANGERED ECOSYSTEM ON EARTH
123
5 CASE STUDIES
159
Documents
219
Important People Events and Concepts
265
Chronology
341
Selected Annotated Bibliography
357
Index
375
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

James E. Sherow is professor of history at Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS. His published works include Watering the Valley and A Sense of the American West: An Anthology of Environmental History. He is the recipient of the Phi Alpha Theta/Westerners International Prize for the best dissertation on the history of the American West.

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