The Great Divorce

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HarperCollins Publishers, Oct 7, 2010 - Religion - 160 pages
62 Reviews

C.S. Lewis’s dazzling allegory about heaven and hell – and the chasm fixed between them – is one of his most brilliantly imaginative tales, as he takes issue with the ideas in William Blake’s ‘The Marriage of Heaven and Hell’.

In a dream, the narrator boards a bus on a drizzly afternoon and embarks on an incredible voyage through Heaven and Hell. He meets a host of supernatural beings far removed from his expectations, from the disgruntled, ghostly inhabitants of Hell to the angels and souls who dwell on the plains of Heaven.

This powerful, exquisitely written fantasy is one of C.S. Lewis’s most enduring works of fiction and a profound meditation on good and evil.

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User Review  - Overstock.com

Perfect satire by the foremost Christian apologist of his age. Thoughtful discussion about heaven, hell and the relationship between our hangups that keep us from choosing the better way Read full review

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User Review  - bezoar44 - LibraryThing

C.S. Lewis is a fine propagandist - more that in this short novel than an apologist. But the power of his allegory - in this, in the Screwtape Letters, in the Narnia Chronicles, in the Out of the ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Born in Ireland in 1898, Clive Staples Lewis gained a triple First at Oxford and was Fellow and Tutor at Magdalen College from 1925-54, where he was a contemporary of Tolkien. In 1954 he became Professor of Mediaeval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge. C. S. Lewis was for many years an atheist, until his conversion, memorably described in his autobiography ‘Surprised by Joy’: “I gave in, and admitted that God was God ... perhaps the most dejected and reluctant convert in all England.” He is celebrated for his famous series of children’s books, the Narnia Chronicles (which have been filmed and broadcast many times), as well as his literary criticism and science fiction. C. S. Lewis died on 22nd November 1963.