The Greening of Economic Policy Reform: Principles

Front Cover
The economywide policy reform programs that have been undertaken in developing countries in recent years often address macroeconomic problems with little or no regard for their environmental impact, be it positive or negative. This book and its companion volume of case studies demonstrate that there are significant payoffs from a greater understanding of such impacts.The case studies, summarized in Volume I and presented in full in Volume II, provide empirical evidence of the links between macroeconomic policies and the environment and reflect a wide range of country situations and environmental problems: air pollution issues in Poland and Sri Lanka; deforestation and land degradation in Costa Rica; migration and deforestation in the Philippines; overgrazing of agricultural lands in Tunisia; overcultivation in Ghana; water resource depletion in Morocco; and wildlife management in Zimbabwe. The volumes also show the variety of analytical methods used to identify the linkages between policy actions and their environmental impacts.

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Contents

Overview
7
Figures
23
Sectoral Policies
25
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Professor Mohan Munasinghe has post-graduate degrees in engineering, physics and development economics, from Cambridge University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, McGill University, and Concordia University. Presently, he is Chairman of the Munasinghe Institute For Development (MIND), Colombo; Vice Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Geneva; and Hon. Chief Energy Advisor to the Government of Sri Lanka, Colombo. From 1974-2002, he worked for the World Bank, Washington DC, in various positions including Director and Senior Advisor. From 1982 to 1987, he was the Senior Energy Advisor to the President of Sri Lanka. During 1990-92, he served as Advisor to the United States President's Council on Environmental Quality. He has implemented international development projects for three decades, and contributed to IPCC work for 15 years. He has won a number of international awards and medals for his research, authored over 80 books and several hundred technical papers, and serves on the editorial boards of a dozen international journals.