The Gulag Archipelago Volume 2: An Experiment in Literary Investigation

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Harper Collins, Aug 7, 2007 - History - 752 pages
13 Reviews

Volume 2 of the gripping epic masterpiece, The story of Solzhenitsyn's entrance into the Soviet prison camps, where he would remain for Nearly a decade

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bookmarkaussie - LibraryThing

Under the Czars Russia produced many great writers, but under the Soviets there was only one, Alexander Solzhenitsyn. His Gulag Archipelago is a masterpiece, it is literature and a record of one of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

How many "investigators" are able to document facts while still communicating "literary" values? Solzhenitsyn witnessed that which he testifies into, and he indicts Soviet injustices. The key to ... Read full review

Contents

The DestructiveLabor Camps
1
The Fingers of Aurora
9
The Archipelago Rises from the Sea
25
The Archipelago Metastasizes
71
The Archipelago Hardens
121
What the Archipelago Stands On
142
Theyve Brought the Fascists
168
The Ways of Life and Customs of the Natives
198
The Loyalists
322
Knock Knock Knock
353
Hand Over Your Second Skin Too
375
Changing Ones Fate
391
Punishments
414
The Socially Friendly
425
The Soul and Barbed Wire
595
Translators Notes
673

Women in Camp
227
The Trusties
251
In Place of Politicals
292
Glossary
679
fiutac
693
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

After serving as a decorated captain in the Soviet Army during World War II, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn (1918-2008) was sentenced to prison for eight years for criticizing Stalin and the Soviet government in private letters. Solzhenitsyn vaulted from unknown schoolteacher to internationally famous writer in 1962 with the publication of his novella One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich; he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1968. The writer's increasingly vocal opposition to the regime resulted in another arrest, a charge of treason, and expulsion from the USSR in 1974, the year The Gulag Archipelago, his epic history of the Soviet prison system, first appeared in the West. For eighteen years, he and his family lived in Vermont. In 1994 he returned to Russia. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn died at his home in Moscow in 2008.

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