The Heart of Midlothian

Front Cover
Classic Books Company, 2001 - 482 pages
2 Reviews
"The Heart of Midlothian, " set between the two Jacobean insurrections in 1736 and during the Porteous Riots, marks the peak of its author's achievement; many consider it to be Scott's national epic. Jeanie Deans, the young woman protagonist, takes on a world, bearing the troubles of her family, her community, and her nation on her back. The result is a great and obviously lasting novel. . . .
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - losloper - LibraryThing

This novel, which has always been regarded as one of Scott's finest, opens with the Edinburgh riots of 1736. The people of the city have been infuriated by the actions of John Porteous, Captain of the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - antiquary - LibraryThing

I liked much of this, particular when the heroine appeals to George II's mistress for a pardon for her sister, accused of infanticide under a law that if a woman known to be pregnant could not show ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
1
II
26
III
36
IV
48
V
65
VI
77
VII
94
VIII
110
XIV
228
XV
239
XVI
255
XVII
272
XVIII
289
XIX
323
XX
331
XXI
345

IX
126
X
148
XI
168
XII
180
XIII
209
XXII
356
XXIII
369
XXIV
391
XXV
404

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Page 4 - Atlantic wave ? Is India free ? and does she wear her plumed And jewelled turban with a smile of peace, Or do we grind her still ? The grand debate, The popular harangue, the tart reply, The logic, and the wisdom, and the wit...

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About the author (2001)

Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 15, 1771. He began his literary career by writing metrical tales. The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Marmion, and The Lady of the Lake made him the most popular poet of his day. Sixty-five hundred copies of The Lay of the Last Minstrel were sold in the first three years, a record sale for poetry. His other poems include The Vision of Don Roderick, Rokeby, and The Lord of the Isles. He then abandoned poetry for prose. In 1814, he anonymously published a historical novel, Waverly, or, Sixty Years Since, the first of the series known as the Waverley novels. He wrote 23 novels anonymously during the next 13 years. The first master of historical fiction, he wrote novels that are historical in background rather than in character: A fictitious person always holds the foreground. In their historical sequence, the Waverley novels range in setting from the year 1090, the time of the First Crusade, to 1700, the period covered in St. Roman's Well (1824), set in a Scottish watering place. His other works include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, and The Bride of Lammermoor. He died on September 21, 1832.

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