The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine

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Oxford University Press, USA, Jun 2, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 232 pages
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This engaging book examines what the Hippocratic Oath meant to Greek physicians 2400 years ago and reflects on its relevance to medical ethics today. Drawing on the writings of ancient physicians, Greek playwrights, and modern scholars, each chapter explores one of its passages and concludes with a modern case discussion. The Oath proposes principles governing the relationship between the physician and society and patients. It rules out the use of poison and a hazardous abortive technique. It defines integrity and discretion in physicians' speech. The ancient Greek medical works written during the same period as the Oath reveal that Greek physicians understood that they had a duty to avoid medical errors and learn from bad outcomes. These works showed how and why to tell patients about their diseases and dire prognoses in order to develop a partnership for healing and to build the credibility of the profession. Miles uses these writings to illuminate the meaning of the Oath in its day and in so doing shows how and why it remains a valuable guide to the ethical practice of medicine. This is a book for anyone who loves medicine and is concerned about the ethics and history of this profession.
 

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Contents

3
26
4
35
LEARNERS 43
43
II
49
THE HEALTH OF THE PUBLIC
55
DEADLY DRUGS
66
7
81
8
95
10
124
11
139
12
149
Ill
159
13
161
THE OATH FOR OUR TIME
171
k
187
THE OATH AS A CURRICULAR
189

9
105
4 _
111
Table APPBl continued
191
BIBLIOGRAPHY
193

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Page 13 - ... they desire to learn it without fee and covenant; to give a share of precepts and oral instruction and all the other learning to my sons and to the sons of him who has instructed me and to pupils who have signed the covenant and have taken an oath according to the medical law, but to no one else.

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About the author (2005)

Steven H. Miles is at University of Minnesota.

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