The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar, to the Revolution in 1688, Volume 8

Front Cover
Christie & Son; Baldwin & Company; Sharpe & Son; Akerman; Smith & Company ... [and 40 others], 1819 - Great Britain
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 172 - Mark, child! what I say: They will cut off my head! and perhaps make thee a king: But mark what I say, thou must not be a king, as long as thy brothers Charles and James are alive. They will cut off thy brothers' heads, when they can catch them! And thy head too they will cut off at last! Therefore, I charge thee, do not be made a king by them!
Page 173 - It will soon carry you a great way. It will carry you from earth to heaven, and there you shall find, to your great joy, the prize to which you hasten, a crown of glory.
Page 9 - I do promise, in the presence of Almighty God, and as I hope for his blessing and protection, that I will, to the utmost of my power, defend and maintain the true reformed protestant religion, established in the church of England, and, by the grace of God, in the same will live and die.
Page 316 - He placed his soldiers in the streets which led to Westminster Hall. When the speaker came in his coach, he ordered the horses to be turned, and very civilly conducted him home. The other members were in like manner intercepted. And the two regiments in Palace-yard, observing that they were exposed to derision, peaceably retired to their quarters. A little before this bold enterprise, a solemn fast had been kept by the army; and it is remarked, that this ceremony was the usual prelude to every signal...
Page 241 - I have sought the Lord night and day, that He would rather slay me than put me upon the doing of this work.
Page 208 - Lord, vouchsafe yet to touch the obdurate heart of this proud incorrigible sinner, this wicked, perjured, traitorous, and profane person, who refuses to hearken to the voice of thy kirk...
Page 86 - Merchiston, son of the famous inventor of the logarithms, the person to whom the title of GREAT MAN is more justly due, than to any other whom his country ever produced. There was in Scotland another party, who professing equal attachment to the king's service, pretended only to differ with Montrose about the means of attaining the same end; and of that party, Duke Hamilton was the leader. This nobleman had cause to be extremely devoted to the king, not only by reason of the...
Page 301 - ... with equal facility both the riches of the south and the poverty of the north; to be feared and courted by all foreign princes, and adopted a brother...
Page 64 - ... authority of the priestly office : the fanaticism of the independents, exalted to a higher pitch, abolished ecclesiastical government, disdained creeds and systems, neglected every ceremony, and confounded all ranks and orders. The soldier, the merchant, the mechanic, indulging the fervours of zeal, and guided by the illapses of the spirit, resigned himself to an inward and superior direction, and was consecrated, in a manner, by an immediate intercourse and communication with heaven.
Page 241 - You are no longer a parliament : I tell you, you are no longer a parliament. The Lord has done with you : he has chosen other instruments for carrying on his work." Sir Harry Vane exclaiming against this proceeding, he cried with a loud voice, " O! sir Harry Vane, sir Harry Vane! the Lord deliver me from sir Harry Vane !" Taking hold of Martin by the cloak, " Thou art a whore-master,

Bibliographic information