The Hollywood Standard: The Complete and Authoritative Guide to Script Format and Style

Front Cover
Michael Wiese Productions, 2009 - Authorship - 224 pages
0 Reviews
The Hollywood Standard describes in clear, vivid prose and hundreds of examples how to format every element of a screenplay or television script. A reference for everyone who writes for the screen, from the novice to the veteran, this is the dictionary of script format, with instructions for formatting everything from the simplest master scene heading to the most complex and challenging musical underwater dream sequence. This new edition includes a quick start guide, plus new chapters on avoiding a dozen deadly formatting mistakes, clarifying the difference between a spec script and production script, and mastering the vital art of proofreading. For the first time, readers will find instructions for formatting instant messages, text messages, email exchanges and caller ID.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Avoiding a Dozen Deadly Formatting Mistakes
13
FAQs about Ten Things and Deadly Mistakes
19
Spec Scripts vs Production Drafts
20
SingleCamera Film Format
23
Margins and fonts for singlecamera film format
24
Standard singlecamera film format margins
25
Are script pages printed on one side of the page or two?
27
Script page template
28
Margins for simultaneous dialogue
98
Four simultaneous speakers
99
Transitions
103
Cuts
104
Dissolves
105
Wipes
106
Breaking a page at a transition
107
Punctuation
109

Shot Headings
29
Location
31
Type of shot
32
Extreme closeup
33
Medium shot
34
Tracking and moving shot
35
Aerial shot
36
Up angle and down angle
37
POV shot
38
Handheld shot
41
Time of Day
42
How to arrange the information in a shot heading
44
How to decide what information to include in shot headings
45
How to decide when to create a new shot heading
46
What NOT to include in a shot heading
51
Formatting specialized sequences
52
Montages and series of shots
54
Intercut sequences
56
Split screen sequences
57
Capitalizing McDonalds and DeVries in shot headings
58
A rogues gallery of nonstandard shot headings
59
FAQs about shot headings
61
DIRECTION
63
Breaking a page in the middle of direction
64
Capitalization in direction
65
How to handle the reintroduction of a speaking character who appears at various ages
67
Describing camera direction
70
The expressions into frame out of frame into view and out of view
72
Superimpositions
73
Capitalizing the first letter of direction following a shot heading
74
Underscoring in direction
75
Caller ID
77
Email
78
FAQs about direction
79
DIALOGUE
81
Numbered names over dialogue
82
Capitalizing McDonalds and DeVries over dialogue
83
Using Voice instead of VO and OS
85
Emphasizing words in dialogue
86
Breaking words with a hyphen in dialogue
87
Five rules of parenthetical character direction
88
Sotto voce beat re
91
Foreign language dialogue and subtitles
93
Breaking a page in the middle of dialogue
94
Adding contd CONTD or continuing when a speech is broken by direction
95
Double triple and quadruple dialogue
96
Hyphen
110
Quotation marks
111
Punctuation and capitalization in direct address
112
The Evolution of a Script from First Draft to Production Draft
115
Scene numbers
116
When scene numbers are locked
118
Numbering A scenes
119
Colored paper
120
Full drafts vs revised pages
121
Scene Revision slugs
122
A pages
123
Managing page numbers when a script is revised
127
Special Pages
131
Name
132
Contact information
133
When a script is based on other material or on a true story
134
Sets pages
136
Last pages
138
MultiCamera Film Format
141
Standard multicamera film format margins
142
Shot Headings
143
Direction
144
Underscoring camera direction
145
Parenthetical character direction
146
Character listings
147
Subsequent pages
148
Page one
149
Last page of each act
150
Breaking pages
151
No CONTINUEDs
152
Breaking near a shot heading
153
Unleashing the Power of Script Typing Software
154
What computers cant do
155
Doityourself software solutions
156
Dont let the autopilot fly you into the ground
157
Mac vs PC
158
Filenaming protocol
159
The Scourge of Typos and the Power of Proofreading
160
A Final Word
163
Singlecamera film format sample scripts pages
165
Multicamera film format sample script pages
177
Title cast and sets sample pages
183
Index
191
About the Author
198
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Chris Riley is a recognized industry expert in ECM, SharePoint, Big Data, and Cloud. He has 15 years of experience in the ECM arena. He holds the following certifications from AIIM, the enterprise content management (ECM) trade organization: "Enterprise Content Management Practitioner (ECMp)," "Information, Organization, and Access Practitioner (IOAp)," and "Capture." Chris is a sought after speaker and educator throughout the content gathering and delivery space.

Bibliographic information