The Horse and His Boy (rack)

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Harper Collins, Jul 1, 1994 - Juvenile Fiction - 256 pages
41 Reviews

An orphaned boy and a kidnapped horse gallop for Narnia...and freedom.

 

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Review: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Horse and His Boy, Softcover

User Review  - Natalie - Christianbook.com

An amazing story...that you won't want to miss out on! It all starts off with a young boy named Shasta. His father is very cruel to this poor boy, and so Shasta runs away with this horse named Bree ... Read full review

the horse

User Review  - 25305 - Overstock.com

THe BoOk Iz ABOUT this boy who is command 2 be a slave...the horse in the story is a slavehorse too..the horse talks its really impressing.. There trying to escape to go to narnia...the boy is called ... Read full review

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Contents

How Shasta Set Out on His Travels
1
A Wayside Adventure
19
At the Gates of Tashbaan
37
Shasta Falls In With the Narnians
53
Prince Corin
71
Shasta Among the Tombs
87
Aravis in Tashbaan
101
In the House of the Tisroc
117
Across the Desert
131
The Hermit of the Southern March
147
The Unwelcome Fellow Traveler
163
Shasta in Narnia
179
The Fight at Anvard
195
How Bree Became a Wiser Horse
211
Rabadash the Ridiculous
227
Copyright

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Page 216 - The scratches on your back, tear for tear, throb for throb, blood for blood, were equal to the stripes laid on the back of your stepmother's slave because of the drugged sleep you cast upon her. You needed to know what it felt like.
Page 177 - Kings in Narnia. But after one glance at the Lion's face he slipped out of the saddle and fell at its feet. He couldn't say anything but then he didn't want to say anything, and he knew he needn't say anything. The High King above all kings stooped towards him. Its mane, and some strange and solemn perfume that hung about the mane, was all round him. It touched his forehead with its tongue. He lifted his face and their eyes met. Then instantly the pale brightness of the mist and the fiery brightness...
Page 243 - The Magician's Nephew; The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; The Horse and His Boy; Prince Caspian; The Voyage of the "Dawn Treader"; The Silver Chair; and The Last Battle.
Page 178 - But after one glance at the Lion's face he slipped out of the saddle and fell at its feet. He couldn't say anything but then he didn't want to say anything, and he knew he needn't say anything. The High King above all kings stooped towards him. Its mane, and some strange and solemn perfume that hung about the mane, was all round him. It touched his forehead with its tongue. He lifted his face and their eyes met. Then instantly the pale brightness of the mist and the fiery brightness of the Lion rolled...
Page 158 - I have now lived a hundred and nine winters in this world and have never yet met any such thing as Luck.
Page 176 - Myself said the Voice, very deep and low so that the earth shook, and again 'Myself,' loud and clear and gay, and then the third time 'Myself,' whispered so softly you could hardly hear it.
Page 200 - Then a spear came straight at him and as he ducked to avoid it he rolled right off his horse, bashed his left knuckles terribly against someone else's armour, and then — But it is no use trying to describe the battle from Shasta's point of view; he understood too little of the fight in general and even of his own part in it. The best way I can tell you what really happened is to take you some miles away to where the Hermit of the Southern March sat gazing into the smooth pool beneath the spreading...
Page 176 - I was the lion who drove the jackals from you while you slept. I was the lion who gave the Horses the new strength of fear for the last mile so that you should reach King Lune in time. And...

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About the author (1994)

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably the most influential Christian writer of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English literature at Oxford University until 1954 when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. His major contributions in literary criticism, children's literature, fantasy literature, and popular theology brought him international renown and acclaim. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include The Chronicles of Narnia, Out of the Silent Planet, The Four Loves, The Screwtape Letters, and Mere Christianity.

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Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales mÁs importantes del siglo veinte y podrÍa decirse que fue el escritor cristiano mÁs influyente de su tiempo. Fue profesor particular de literatura inglesa y miembro de la junta de gobierno en la Universidad Oxford hasta 1954, cuando fue nombrado profesor de literatura medieval y renacentista en la Universidad Cambridge, cargo que desempeÑÓ hasta que se jubilÓ. Sus contribuciones a la crÍtica literaria, literatura infantil, literatura fantÁstica y teologÍa popular le trajeron fama y aclamaciÓn a nivel internacional. C. S. Lewis escribiÓ mÁs de treinta libros, lo cual le permitiÓ alcanzar una enorme audiencia, y sus obras aÚn atraen a miles de nuevos lectores cada aÑo. Sus mÁs distinguidas y populares obras incluyen Las CrÓnicas de Narnia, Los Cuatro Amores, Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino y Mero Cristianismo.

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