The Hudson Bay Road (1498-1915)

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J. M. Dent & sons, limited, 1915 - Hudson Bay Railway - 264 pages
 

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Page 26 - In a few seconds the horrible scene commenced ; it was shocking beyond description ; the poor unhappy victims were surprised in the midst of their sleep, and had neither time nor power to make any resistance ; men, women, and children, in all upward of twenty, ran out of their tents stark naked, and endeavoured to make their escape ; but the Indians having possession of all the landside, to no place could they fly for shelter.
Page 7 - ... the sole trade and commerce of all those seas, straits, bays, rivers, lakes, creeks and sounds, in whatsoever latitude they shall be, that lie within the entrance of the straits...
Page 246 - My father, you have spoken well. You have told me that Heaven is very beautiful — tell me now one thing more. Is it more beautiful than the country of the musk-ox in summer, when sometimes the mist blows over the lakes, and sometimes the water is blue and the whippoor-will calls very often ? That is beautiful, and if Heaven is more beautiful my heart will be glad. I shall be content to rest there until I am very old.
Page 100 - ... in less than 45 feet of water thus preventing their closer approach than 15 or 18 miles, a distance considerably greater than the effective range of even the heaviest guns. The lighter ships which might approach closer carry correspondingly lighter guns. The establishment of strong batteries and forts at Sam's creek would seem to be all that is necessary to render Port Nelson absolutely unassailable. It might be mentioned here in passing the greatly increased difficulty a hostile fleet would...
Page 180 - One village has been established near the depot at Norway House, and another at the Pas on the Saskatchewan, each having a church, and school-house, and a considerable space of cultivated ground. The conduct of the people is quiet and inoffensive ; war is unknown in the Cree district ; and the Company's officers "find little difficulty in hiring the young men as occasional laborers.
Page 30 - With such a defence one would suppose that Churchill should have been safe from attacking foes, but this does not seem to have been the case, for history informs us that on the 8th of August, 1782, the gallant La Perouse and his three vessels of war, with, it is said, naught but scurvysmitten crews, made their appearance before the muchamazed garrison of thirty-nine men, and demanded an unconditional surrender, which was granted without resistance, and the gates of the great stone fort thrown open...
Page 183 - Of all the nations which I have seen on this continent, the Knisteneaux women are the most comely. Their figure is generally well proportioned, and the regularity of their features would be acknowledged by the more civilized people of Europe. Their complexion has less of that dark tinge which is common to those savages who have less cleanly habits.
Page 221 - All night long, a voyageur would, watch by watch, pace round this gallery, crying out at intervals, with a quid of tobacco in his cheek, the hours and the state of the weather. This was a precaution in case of fire, and the hour-calling was to prevent him falling asleep for any length of time. Some of the less important and more distant outposts were only rough little log-cabins among the snow, without picket or other enclosure, where a ' postmaster ' resided to superintend the affairs of the Company....
Page 182 - A portion of the Cree, as appears from the tradition given by Lacombe (Diet. Lang. Cris), inhabited for a time the region about Red River, intermingled with the Chippewa and Maskegon, but were attracted to the plains by the buffalo, the Cree like the Chippewa being essentially a forest people. Many bands of Cree were virtually nomads, their movements being governed largely by the food supply. The Cree are closely related, linguistically and otherwise, to the Chippewa.
Page 183 - Their figure is generally well proportioned, and the regularity of their features would be acknowledged by the more civilized people of Europe. Their complexion has less of that dark tinge which is common to those savages who have less cleanly habits." Umfreville, from whom Mackenzie appears to have copied in part what is here stated, says that they are more inclined to be lean of body than otherwise, a corpulent Indian being "a much greater curiosity than a sober one.

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