The Hunt for the Seventh

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Mar 2, 2010 - Juvenile Fiction - 288 pages
29 Reviews

Jim moves to ancient Minerva Hall and encounters the ghosts of six children. They urge him to find the seventh child and leave him cryptic clues that point to a dark, ancient prophecy that only Jim can stop from being fulfilled. Jim turns to Einstein, a brilliant autistic boy who lives at the Hall. If anyone can help Jim, Einstein can. But the boy, who speaks in riddles, proves to be as mysterious as the dead children. Time is running out; if Jim doesn't figure out the clues, innocent people will die.

Christine Morton-Shaw has linked ancient rites with modern mystery to create a chilling, suspenseful tale that will keep readers guessing to the very end.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - smheatherly2 - LibraryThing

The novel started out very suspenseful, with the main character trying to figure out the mystery of dying children in his new hometown. Where the author went astray was when she turned him into a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lkmuir - LibraryThing

When his father starts a new job at Minerva Hall as a gardener, twelve-year-old Jim discovers an ancient curse that needs to be unraveled before disaster happens. Read full review

All 22 reviews »

Contents

I
1
II
5
III
15
IV
30
V
47
VI
60
VII
74
VIII
91
XII
151
XIII
163
XIV
183
XV
195
XVI
217
XVII
231
XVIII
241
XIX
256

IX
115
X
129
XI
140
XX
267
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Christine Morton-Shaw has felt "visited" all her life. She often has to sidestep people she then realizes others can't see at all. Sometimes these impressions or visions can take a sudden step closer: "It is as if the skin between this world and another world begins to get thinner. Things in that other place become clearer and louder. I'm quite happy with all this strangeness and charm, and can't imagine life without it."

She feels at home in ruined buildings or medieval houses and streets. Ancient scripts and old manuscripts and diaries seem alive to her. Some of the things in The Hunt for the Seventh have happened to her, particularly the gray glimpses and the whispers.

Christine Morton-Shaw lives with her family in Sheffield, England. She is the author of The Riddles of Epsilon and many picture books for children.

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