The Hurlbut Genealogy: Or, Record of the Descendants of Thomas Hurlbut, of Saybrook and Wethersfield, Conn., who Came to America as Early as the Year 1637. With Notices of Others Not Identified as His Descendants

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J. Munsell's Sons, 1888 - Digital images - 545 pages
 

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Page 16 - Spencer in the back, into his kidneys, myself into the thigh, two more were shot dead. But in our retreat I kept Hurlbut and Spencer still before us, we defending ourselves with our naked swords, or else they had taken us all alive, so that the two sore wounded men, by our slow retreat, got home with their guns, when our two sound men ran away and left their guns behind them.
Page 16 - Hurlbut, being sentinels, called to me, saying there came a number of Indians out of the other side of the marsh. Then I went to stop them, that they should not get the wood-land ; but Thomas Hurlbut cried out to me that some of the men did not follow me, for Thomas Rumble and Arthur Branch, threw down their two guns and ran away ; then the Indians shot two of them that were in the reeds, and sought to get between us and home, but durst not come before us, but kept us in a...
Page 16 - Presently there starts up four Indians out of the fiery reeds, but ran away, I calling to the rest of our men to come away out of the marsh. Then Robert Chapman and Thomas Hurlbut, being sentinels, called to me, saying there came a number of Indians out of the other side of the marsh. Then I went to stop them, that they should not get the wood-land; but Thomas Hurlbut cried out to me that some of the men did not follow me, for Thomas...
Page 16 - ... with him to kindle the fire withal. But when we came to the small of the Neck, the weeds burning, I having before this set two sentinels on the small of the Neck, I called to the men that were burning the reeds to come away, but they would not until they had burnt up the rest of their matches...
Page 17 - Gardiner does not mention his estimate of the number of the assailants, but Underwood, in his History, says there were " a hundred or more." Mr. Hurlbut was by trade a blacksmith, and after the war with the Pequots, he located and established himself in business at Wethersfield, Ct., and was one of the early settlers of that place, as well as first blacksmith.
Page 16 - I have now endeavoured to answer your Desires and having rumaged and found some old papers then written it was a great help to my memory. You know that when I came to you I was an engineer or architect, whereof carpentry is a little part, but you know I could never...
Page 16 - In the 22d of February, I went out with ten men, and three dogs, half a mile from the house, to burn the weeds, leaves and reeds, upon the neck of land, because we had felled twenty...
Page 11 - Quarterly argent and sable in the sinister chief and dexter base, each a lion rampant, or, over all a bend gules, charged with the amulets of the third.
Page 17 - It appears on the records that he received various tracts of land in the several divisions of the Town, which were recorded together in 1647. In 1660 the Town of Wethersfield granted Thomas UuHl'ut, Lot 39, one of the
Page 113 - ... felt the present pressure, but anticipated none of the future prosperity and glory in reserve. This disappointment, in a neighboring State, had produced open resistance to the laws,— rebellion! It was a contagious spirit, and such as municipal lines could not confine. Much was feared from it here. A spark from that flame in Berkshire county had flown over into Sharon. One Dr. Hurlbut, an emissary of Shay's, visited that town, in the spring of 1787, to enlist men in his cause. He made some impression.

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