The Immediate Experience: Movies, Comics, Theatre & Other Aspects of Popular Culture

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Harvard University Press, 1962 - Performing Arts - 302 pages
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This collection of essays, which originally appeared as a book in 1962, is virtually the complete works of an editor of Commentary magazine who died, at age 37, in 1955. Long before the rise of Cultural Studies as an academic pursuit, in the pages of the best literary magazines of the day, Robert Warshow wrote analyses of the folklore of modern life that were as sensitive and penetrating as the writings of James Agee, George Orwell, and Walter Benjamin. Some of these essays--notably "The Westerner," "The Gangster as Tragic Hero," and the pieces on the New Yorker, Mad Magazine, Arthur Miller's The Crucible, and the Rosenberg letters--are classics, once frequently anthologized but now hard to find.

Along with a new preface by Stanley Cavell, The Immediate Experience includes several essays not previously published in the book--on Kafka and Hemingway--as well as Warshow's side of an exchange with Irving Howe.

 

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Contents

The Legacy of the 30s
3
Woofed with Dreams
19
Poet of the Jewish Middle Class
25
The Idealism of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
39
Paul the Horror Comics and Dr Wertham
53
E B White and the New Yorker
75
An Old Man Gone
79
The Gangster as Tragic Hero
97
The Flight from Europe
213
Paisan
221
The Enclosed Image
231
ReViewing the Russian Movies
239
Kafkas Failure
255
The Dying Gladiator
261
Hope and Wisdom
265
Essence of Judaism
269

The Westerner
105
The Anatomy of Falsehood
125
Father and Sonand the FBI
133
The Movie Camera and the American
143
The Liberal Conscience in The Crucible
159
Monsieur Verdoux
177
A Feeling of Sad Dignity
193
The Working Day at the Splendide
273
Sadism for the Masses
277
Gerty and the G Is
281
The Art of the Film
285
AFTER HALF A CENTURY
289
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
301
Copyright

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About the author (1962)

Robert Warshow was one of the few critics of his day to engage deeply and seriously with popular art and culture. He was an editor of Commentary Magazine who died, at age 37, in 1955.

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