The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi

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University Press of Kentucky, Jul 24, 2013 - Performing Arts - 560 pages

In the 1931 film Dracula, Bela Lugosi set the standard for horror film villainy. Though many actors have donned the cape since that first production, remnants of Hungarian-born Lugosi's portrayal continue to surface in popular culture -- from highly prized memorabilia to a character on Sesame Street. After a decade of trying vainly to broaden his range, Lugosi gave up his ambitions and began to support himself with roles that were all in some way a variation of the first. Ultimately, Lugosi became a sad parody of his former self, and the last years of his life were marked by financial crises, family turmoil, and drug addiction. Offering new insights into the films and personality of an actor who could not overcome Hollywood typecasting, The Immortal Count is the definitive account of Lugosi's tragic life.

 

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The immortal count: the life and films of Bela Lugosi

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Though many actors portrayed Dracula, none compared with Bela Lugosi's hypnotic vampire. While that role won him praise, it haunted his professional career, turning him into a cult legend among horror ... Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
BELA
THE EARLY YEARS
BROADWAY TO HOLLYWOOD
THE FATEFUL DECISION
DRACULATHE FILM
FAME
THE PEAK
THE COMEBACK
THE WAR YEARS
THE DECLINE
THE FINAL YEARS
EPILOGUE
FILMOGRAPHY
LUGOSIS EARNINGS
NOTES

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About the author (2013)

Arthur Lennig, emeritus professor of cinema at the University of Albany, is the author of Stroheim and several other books on silent film.

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