The Imperial Valley and the Salton Sink

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Page 137 - ... with the right to be heard as hereinafter provided with respect to the hearing of complaints or the issuance of securities; and said notice shall also be published for three consecutive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation in each county in or through which said line of railroad is constructed or operates.
Page 140 - Illinois rivers wherever it shall be necessary so to do to prevent overflow or damage along said river, and shall remove the dams at Henry and Copperas Creek in the Illinois river, before any water shall be turned into the said channel. And the canal commissioners, if they shall find at any time that an additional supply of water has been added to either of said rivers, by any drainage district or districts, to maintain a depth of not less than six feet from any dam owned by the State, to...
Page 136 - It shall be the duty of said commission to make a careful investigation of each and every body of water, both river and lake, in the State of Illinois, and to ascertain to what extent, if at all, the same have been encroached upon by private interests or individuals, and wherever they believe that the same have been so encroached upon, to commence appropriate action either to recover full compensation for such wrongful encroachment, or to recover the use of the same, or of any lands improperly or...
Page 136 - Illinois, is a body of water about six miles in length and from three-quarters of a mile to a mile and a half in width...
Page 112 - The flooding of a district about once in fifty years would not seem to involve sufficient damage to incur great expense to provide against flooding, but when the ability to readily sell the land is considered, it is probable that a liberal factor of safety in the height of the levees is justified.
Page 12 - Peoria and 125,000 cubic feet per second at the mouth of the river. These rates are equivalent respectively to 5.94 and 4.48 cubic feet per second per square mile of drainage area. At nearly all places upon the river the flood of 1844 reached a greater height than any flood of record before or since. This flood occurred during the maximum flood upon the Mississippi and the water passed through a river valley entirely unimproved, very likely a veritable jungle. Under all these circumstances, it is...
Page 140 - ... if they shall find at any time that an additional supply of water has been added to either of said rivers, by any drainage district or districts, to maintain a depth of not less than six feet from any dam owned by the State, to and into the first lock of the Illinois and Michigan Canal at...
Page 43 - Engineer dept. Report upon survey, with plans and estimates of cost, for a navigable waterway 14 feet deep from Lockport, 111., by way of Des Plaines and Illinois rivers, to the mouth of said Illinois River, and thence by way of the Mississippi River to St. Louis, Mo., and for a navigable waterway of 7 and 8 feet depth, respectively, from the head of navigation of Illinois River at Lasalle, 111., through said river to Ottawa, 111., by the Mississippi River commission, covering the section below the...
Page 43 - OF 1902-1904. Under date of December 18, 1905, the Secretary of War transmitted to Congress the result of a. study by a special board of engineers, relating to a navigable waterway 14 feet deep from the terminus of the Chicago Drainage Canal to the mouth of the Illinois River, and thence by way of the Mississippi River to St. Louis. This report was based upon an investigation, survey and study covering a period from September 18, 1902, to December 12, 1905. The investigation included a topographical...
Page 72 - From the information I can get as an official of the Illinois Fishermen's Association from all points along the Illinois River, the carp have brought more money than the catch of all the other fish combined. Long live the carp!' Carp are now found very generally distributed over the State, being most common, however, in the Illinois River and in our other larger and more sluggish streams and lakes and bayous connecting with them. They are not yet very abundant in southern Illinois. The carp catch...

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