The International Studio, Volume 54

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Page 173 - The imitator is a poor kind of creature. If the man who paints only the tree, or flower, or other surface he sees before him were an artist, the king of artists would be the photographer. It is for the artist to do something beyond this: in portrait painting to put on canvas something more than the face the model wears for that one day: to paint the man, in short, as well as his features; in arrangement of colours to treat a flower as his key, not as his model.
Page cxxiii - I trust hereby to make it manifest with what small willingness I endure to interrupt the pursuit of no less hopes than these, and leave a calm and pleasing solitariness fed with cheerful and confident thoughts, to embark in a troubled sea of noises and hoarse disputes; put from beholding the bright countenance of Truth in the quiet and still air of delightful studies...
Page 162 - We subsist on a number of architectural habits, on scraps of tradition, on caprices and prejudices, and above all on this mass of more or less specious axioms, of half-truths, unrelated, uncriticised and often contradictory, by means of which there is no building so bad that it cannot with a little ingenuity be justified, or so good that it cannot plausibly be condemned.
Page 162 - Queen, believing she would have bought it, it being a crucifix ; but, when his Majesty was gone, a French peddling woman, one Madame de Boord, who used to bring petticoats and fans, and baubles, out of France to the ladies, began to find fault with several things in the work, which she understood no more than an ass, or a monkey...
Page 118 - ... of this protest claim that they are in no sense a partisan body. Their contention in this matter is that the splendid monuments of the arts of the Middle Ages which have been destroyed or damaged are the inheritance of the whole world, and that it is the duty of all civilized communities to endeavor to preserve them for the benefit and instruction of posterity. While France and Belgium are individually the poorer from such wanton destruction, the world at large is no less impoverished. On these...
Page 118 - Rheims, this defense cannot hold good against the mass of evidence to the contrary. The signatories of this protest claim that they are in no sense a partisan body. Their contention in this matter is that the splendid monuments of the arts of the Middle Ages which have been destroyed or damaged are the inheritance of the whole world, and that it is the duty of all civilized communities to endeavor to preserve them for the benefit and instruction of posterity.
Page li - ... other by the Persian Garden, we are forced, I think, to acknowledge the unhappy significance of so conspicuous a disqualification. "I find, for example, in their home a Steinway parlor grand, in place of the inevitable Victrola, and it is from an atmosphere permeated with a gentleness of demeanor, a breadth of interest, an unobtrusive cultivation, that the work of Mrs. Vonnoh comes to us.
Page xcvi - ... difficulties which are themselves opportunities for struggle and effort. Through matter we become aware of each other, and can communicate with those of our fellows who have ideas sufficiently like our own for them to be stimulated into activity by a merely physical process set in action by ourselves. By a timed succession of vibratory movements (as in speech and music), or by a static distribution of materials (as in writing, painting, and sculpture...
Page 3 - ... the group of Faith, wherein kneels a Patriarch, who offers consolation to a woman to whom he presents the hope of immortality, holding in his hands a scarab, ancient symbol of renewed life. Next come two recumbent figures, a man and a woman, the first Sorrow, the other typifying Final Slumber. These are about to be drawn into oblivion by the relentless hand of Destiny. The Tower: The sculpture on the Tower by Chester Beach is in three principal stages, representing the evolution of the race....
Page 4 - Hand of Destiny." Mr. Aitken has depicted in these sculptures a conception of life with its sorrows, joys, hopes, and tragedies, its bright and its dark side, all with rare intellectuality, artistic fitness, and with unusual technical excellence, for the man is a master craftsman. He has injected much personal charm, shown the grandeur of life, along with the physical perfection of man and womanhood in their alluring quality of youth, and the figures pulsate with life.

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