The International Studio, Volume 56

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Page 200 - Harry is valiant ; for the cold blood he did naturally inherit of his father, he hath, like lean, sterile, and bare land, manured, husbanded, and tilled, with excellent endeavour of drinking good and good store of fertile sherris, that he is become very hot and valiant. If I had a thousand sons, the first human principle I would teach them should be, — to forswear thin potations, and to addict themselves to sack.
Page xiv - I NEVER saw a Purple Cow; I never Hope to See One; But I can Tell you, Anyhow, I'd rather See than Be One.
Page xvi - Let us do our work as well, Both the unseen and the seen; Make the house where gods may dwell Beautiful, entire, and clean. Else our lives are incomplete, Standing in these walls of Time, Broken stairways, where the feet Stumble, as they seek to climb.
Page 73 - ... personal bias he has given to it ; in the search for new sensations of the most subtle kind and in a tendency at times to exalt good manners, that is to say style, above the qualities of intrinsic merit. His art has been too much a product of himself, notwithstanding that it reflects in spiritualized form the higher tendencies of his age, for him to have been the founder of a school or to have influenced followers directly. Yet, indirectly, his influence has been weighty. Alike by his example...
Page 166 - ... to exhibit; for it happens, after some looking at a thing, that one becomes familiar with what was surprising, or, if you will, shocking. Little by little it becomes understood and accepted. Time itself is always imperceptibly at work upon a picture, refining and softening its original harshness. By exhibiting, an artist finds friends and supporters who encourage him in his struggle. M. Manet has always recognised talent where he has met with it, and he has had no pretensions either to overthrow...
Page lxx - ... admire, but something which they should create whenever they dress themselves, deck their rooms, plan their houses, or set forth the windows of their shops. It is mine to show to PRACTICAL that the laws of beauty affect his prosperity at every turn and that to know them is to have a business asset of immense value. It is mine to show to COMPLACENCY that these same laws apply to her life and that for her to know them is to enable her to add to the home its most seductive charm. Most of all, it...
Page 166 - The matter of vital concern, the sine qua non, for the artist, is to exhibit; for it happens, after some looking at a thing, that one becomes familiar with what was surprising, or, if you will, shocking. Little by little it becomes understood and accepted. Time itself is always imperceptibly at work upon a picture, refining and softening its original harshness. By exhibiting, an artist finds friends and supporters who encourage him in his struggle. M. Manet has...
Page lxiv - A bright-eyed boy, who looks from out The door with woodbine wreathed about, And wishes his one thought all day: " Oh, if I could but fly away From this dull spot, the world to see, How happy, happy, happy, How happy I should be!
Page 73 - I went because I was told by a Boston authority that I was nothing but a ragtime sketcher, couldn't see Greek art and couldn't draw it if I did.
Page 73 - what impressed me most was the great feeling of the Greeks for site in placing their temples and shrines in the landscape — -so that they not only became a part of it, but it leads up to them.

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