The Internet for Molecular Biologists: A Practical Approach

Front Cover
Clare E. Sansom, Robert M. Horton
OUP Oxford, Jan 29, 2004 - Computers - 249 pages
The last few decades of the twentieth century will be remembered for two technological revolutions that have already had a profound effect on millions of people's lives. Thanks to communication technologies, and particularly the Internet, we now take immediate access to enormous quantities of information for granted. And thanks to "the new biology," building on the genome projects, some scientists are predicting that cures for the majority of known diseases could be readily available within two generations. These two revolutions are inextricably linked: molecular biology depends on the ready availability of data, and that needs computers and the Internet. There are some surprising parallels between developments in the two technologies. For example, the publicly available gene sequence databases, EMBL and GenBank, are doubling in size approximately every eighteen months. According to Moore's Law, which has held since the invention of the silicon chip, eighteen months is also the time frame in which computer power is expected to double.
This book aims to help the practitioners of the second revolution - molecular biologists who are more at home at a laboratory bench than in front of a computer keyboard - to use the technology of the first, the Internet, more effectively. The Internet For Molecular Biologists - A Practical Approach provides a broad introduction to using Internet based computing resources to support research in molecular biology. After surveying the core databases and other online resources, the focus shifts to tools and techniques for exploiting and authoring Internet-distributed information. Later chapters provide detailed examples of how technologies such as molecular visualisation, VRML and XSLT can be applied to biological problems.
 

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Contents

Abstracts
3
Full text of research articles
11
Final remarks
36
Agricultural biotechnology
57
Internet resources for agricultural biotechnology
59
References
71
Applications
81
Internet tools for cell and developmental biologists
87
Overcoming the barriers to Internet collaboration
128
cyberspacethe IB model
131
How to disseminate information make
135
Computer languages commonly used for the World WideWeb
148
Reference
160
11
172
References
189
Alternative web3D technologies
203

Building simple but powerful web tools
89
How to contribute to the development of web resources
94
Summary and conclusions
100
Collaborative environments and shared tools
107
Collaborative applications in the biosciences
120
Reference
206
Peri
208
References
238
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Clare E. Sansom, Ph.D.School of Crystallography, Birkbeck College, London WC1E 7HX, UK+44 207 631 6800+44 207 631 6803c.sansom@mail.cryst.bbk.ac.ukTeaching Fellow, Birkbeck College, London, UK; freelance bioinformatics consultant and science writerMember of the Institute of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (ILTHE)Associate Member of the Association of British Science WritersEditorial board member of 4 journals including Briefings in BioinformaticsMember of organising committee for ISMB 2004 - the world's premier bioinformatics conference (only of use in conference related publicity?)Robert M. Horton, Ph.D.92 Starlit Circle, Sacramento, CA 95831 USA(916) 395-5523(916) 392-4595rmhorton@attotron.comDirector of Research, Attotron Biosensor Corporation, 106 East Adams Street, Suite 210, Carson City, NV 89706 USA

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