The Invention of the Newspaper: English Newsbooks, 1641-1649

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, 2005 - History - 379 pages
The first weekly newspapers, or 'newsbooks', appeared in 1641. The reasons for their appearance have never been fully understood. The Invention of the Newspaper is the first interdisciplinary account of the origins and early development of the English newspaper, using both manuscript and printed evidence to account for the precise moment of the newsbook's appearance - a few months before the outbreak of civil war. Raymond explores the newsbook's unique place in the flourishing political print culture of the 1640s, showing how it drew from and then reformed elements of literary culture, being both produced by a public hunger for news and, in turn, creating a market for news. The Invention of the Newspaper explores evidence for the distribution and readership of seventeenth-century news publications, which suggests that the early newsbooks were widely read and highly influential, and that - even today - they influence the way in which seventeenth-century history is perceived. Charting the newsbook's development as a genre, its narrative forms, literary merits and influences, and its relationship to other vehicles of communication, printed and spoken, such as sermons, almanacs, and play-pamphlets, Raymond presents a detailed exploration of the newsbook's gradual dominance of the market for information.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

John Pory. Datos biográficos.

Contents

THE OUTBREAK OF THE ENGLISH NEWSBOOK 80
105
NEWSBOOKS STYLE AND POLITICAL
127
NEWSBOOKS PAMPHLETS
184
NEWSBOOKS THEIR DISTRIBUTION
232
NEWSBOOKS
269
Diurnall Occurrences from Manuscript to Print
314
Bibliography
321
Indexes
367
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Born in Cardiff, Joad Raymond took his BA in English and History at UEA, then proceeded to the University of Oxford to do a D.Phil. Between 1993 and 1995 he held a reearch fellowship at Magdalen College before moving to a lectureship at the University of Aberdeen. He has been Senior Lecturerin English Literature, at UEA since 2000.

Bibliographic information