The Italian Novelists: Selected from the Most Approved Authors in that Language: From the Earliest Period Down to the Close of the Eighteenth Century: Arranged in an Historical and Chronological Series, Volume 3

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W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, 1827 - English fiction
 

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Page 83 - There must, however, he no witness to my proceedings ; the patient must be entrusted entirely to me. I should not like every pretender to obtain a knowledge of the secret I possess ; it is one which will require the utmost art in its application." Rejoiced to hear her speak with so much confidence on the subject, the commissioners immediately despatched a message to Messer Filiberto, informing him that, a lady had just arrived from Piedmont, boasting that she could perform what the most learned of...
Page 83 - ... speech, to restore to him that invaluable faculty, possessing for that purpose some secret remedies, which I trust will prove efficacious. In the course of a fortnight he will probably be one of the most eloquent men at court; and I am quite willing to run the risk of the penalty, if I perform not my engagement as required. There must, however, be no witness to my proceedings; the patient must be entrusted entirely to me.
Page 81 - It was with difficulty that their commander himself effected his escape; while king Charles, following up his success, in a short time obtained possession of the whole of Normandy. On this occasion the king returned public thanks to the heroic Filiberto, and in the presence of all the first nobility of his kingdom, invested him with the command of several castles, with a hundred men at arms to attend him. He now stood so high in favour at court, that the monarch spared no expense to obtain the first...
Page 45 - Sabbia, whose immense possessions, surpassing those of any other person, did not, however, prevent him from adding to them by every means in his power. Being perfectly secure against the attacks of conscience in all his dealings, he was never known to suffer remorse for the most unjustifiable actions. He was in the habit of disposing of the produce of his large estates to the poorer citizens and peasantry, instead of selling it to merchants and others who could command ready money ; not from any...
Page 197 - Having only a single moment to decide how she could best defend her menaced honour, she seized a weapon which fortunately lay near her, and smote the youth so severely on the head that he immediately fell to the ground, at the very moment he fancied he was about to succeed in his attempt. His cries drawing the officers of justice to the spot, a strict search took place, during which...
Page 79 - Of an extremely handsome person, and possessing noble and imposing manners, the misfortune under which he appeared to labor was doubly regretted wherever our hero made his appearance. About the period of his arrival in France, Charles, the seventh of that name, was engaged in a warm and sanguinary war against the English, attempting to recover possession of the dominions which his predecessors had lost. Having already driven them from Gascony and other parts, he was busily preparing to follow up...
Page 74 - ... lover. Bribing him to exchange dresses, he took possession for a period of his collection of wares, consisting of every article most tempting to a woman's eyes, either for ornament or for use. Thus armed, he set out in the direction of Donna Zilia's residence, announcing himself as the old traveling merchant with a fresh supply of the choicest goods. These tidings reaching the ears of the lady, she sent to desire him to call at her house, which he directly entered with the utmost familiarity,...
Page 34 - ... his master to church as usual, he heard him after service relating a story to one of the holy brotherhood, who stood swallowing it all with a very serious face, how in the island of Pastinaca the magpies are accustomed to get married in proper form and ceremony, and how, after laying, and sitting upon their eggs for the space of a month, they bring forth little men, not larger than ants, but astonishingly bold and clever. The Florentine upon this could no longer restrain his feelings, crying...
Page 312 - Grasso, thinking the other did not know him, said, " Pray, do you happen to know a person of the name of Grasso, who lives at the back of the Piazza San Giovanni, and makes inlaid work ?" " Know him ! to be sure I do...
Page 78 - Soon after, making the lady a low bow, he took his departure for his own residence. There, taking the affair into his most serious consideration, he at last came to the fixed resolution of submitting to this very severe penalty, as a punishment, at least, for his folly in so lightly sporting with his oath. Suddenly, then, he became dumb, and feigning that he had met with some accident, he set out from Moncaliero on his return to Virle. His friends, on finding him in this sad condition, expressed...

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