The Japanese Film: Art and Industry

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Princeton University Press, 1982 - Art - 526 pages
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Tracing the development of the Japanese cinema from 1896 (when the first Kinetoscope was imported) through the golden ages of film in Japan up to today, this work reveals the once flourishing film industry and the continuing unique art of the Japanese film. Now back in print with updated sections, major revaluations, a comprehensive international bibliography, and an exceptional collection of 168 stills ranging over eight decades, this book remains the unchallenged reference for all who seek a broad understanding of the aesthetic, historical, and economic elements of motion pictures from Japan.

 

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Contents

Slow FadeIn 18961917
21
Establishing Shot 191723
35
Wipe 192327
47
Costume and Property 192731
63
The Talkies Exterior 193139
72
The Talkies Interior 193139 cont
90
Shooting Script 193945
126
Background Projection 193945
148
Content
315
Technique
332
Directors
346
Actors
392
Theaters and Audiences
412
Appendix A Second and Third Thoughts about the Japanese Film
439
Appendix B Terminal Essay
457
Japanese language
481

New Sequence 194549
159
Adaptation and Atmosphere 194954
181
Soft Focus 195459
229
LongShot 195459
259
Directors as Pupils and Teachers
495
Development of Film Production Companies
501
Index
507
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About the author (1982)

Donald Richie was born, in Lima, Ohio on April 17, 1924. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Maritime Service as a civilian typist. He explored Tokyo on foot and began to attend the movies, which he wrote about for Stars and Stripes and later for the Japan Times. He received a bachelor's degree in English from Columbia University in 1953 and then returned to Japan. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he was a film curator at New York's Museum of Modern Art, but by 1973 he returned to live permanently in Japan. He wrote more than 50 books about all aspects of Japan including film, food, social customs, fables, gardens, temples, folk art, music, pop culture, tattoos and sexual mores. His works include The Inland Sea, Memoirs of the Warrior Kumagai, The Films of Akira Kurosawa, and Zen Inklings. He died on February 19, 2013 at the age of 88.

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