The Jesuit Relations and Allied Documents: Travels and Explorations of the Jesuit Missionaries in New France, 1610-1791; the Original French, Latin, and Italian Texts, with English Translations and Notes, Volume 68

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Reuben Gold Thwaites
Burrows Bros. Company, 1900 - Canada
 

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Page 127 - The sun is the principal object of veneration to these people; as they cannot conceive of anything which can be above this heavenly body, nothing else appears to them more worthy of their homage. It is for the same reason that the great Chief of this nation, who knows nothing on the earth more dignified than himself, takes the title of Brother of the Sun. and the credulity of the people maintains him in the despotic authority which he claims.
Page 161 - Chief, and having raised him on their shoulders, they transport him to the quarter in which their cabin is situated. They spread on the ground a large skin, on which they cause him to sit down. One of them places himself behind him, and putting his hands on the Chief's shoulders, he agitates all his body, while the others, seated in a circle on the ground, chant the history of their distinguished deeds. After this ceremony, which is repeated night and morning for four days, the great Chief returns...
Page 157 - My uncle ! my cousin ! ' ' etc. The nearest relatives continue this ceremony for three months ; they cut off their hair in sign of grief, they abstain from painting the body, and are never found at any assembly for festivity.
Page 125 - Yictims whom they had caused to be strangled, to follow their masters into the other world. Another separate shelf supports many flat baskets very gorgeously painted, in which they preserve their idols. These are figures of men and women made of stone or baked clay, the heads and the tails of extraordinary serpents, some stuffed owls, some pieces of crystal, and some jaw bones of large fish.
Page 171 - Noyers wished to make use of the negroes to revenge the death of her husband and the French, but she was betrayed by the person to whom she confided her design, and came very near being burned alive. Some of the French escaped the fury of the Indians by taking refuge in the woods, where they suffered extremely from hunger and the effects of the weather. One of them, on arriving...
Page 137 - They have almost constant dances, while the great Chief and his sister are in an elevated lodge covered with boughs, from whence they can see the joy of their subjects. The Princes, the Princesses, and those who by their office are of distinguished rank are arranged very near the Chief, to whom they show their respect and submission by an infinite variety of ceremonies. The great Chief and his sister make their entrance in the place of the assembly on a litter borne by eight of their greatest men:...
Page 277 - It has been in a very slight degree successful through the impossibility in which our troops are of ever overtaking Them in sufficient numbers to destroy Them. Last year ninety of our young men joined the french expedition against the renards; but after inconceivable hardships and a journey of more than seven hundred leagues, Their guides led them astray, and they were obliged to make their way back without having caught sight of The enemy save in one instance. A party of twentythree savages, nearly...
Page 133 - As for the other servants, their relatives carry them home with them, and bury them with their arms and clothes. The same ceremony is observed in like manner on the death of the brothers and sisters of the great chief. The women are always strangled to follow the latter, except when they have infants at the breast, in which case they continue to live, for the purpose of nourishing them. And we often see many who endeavor to find nurses, or who themselves strangle their infants, so that they shall...
Page 153 - ... sickness." These medicinemen are always paid in advance. If the sick man recovers, their gain is very considerable, but if he should die, they are sure to have their heads cut off by the relatives or friends of the deceased. This never fails to be done, and even the relatives of the medicine-men find nothing at all of which to complain, and do not testify any concern. There is the same rule with some other jugglers, who undertake to procure rain or fair weather. These are commonly indolent old...
Page 177 - In this city, there was no longer any doubt on that point, as soon as they learned what came near being the fate of Father Doutreleau. This missionary had availed himself of the time when the Indians were engaged in their winter occupations, to come and see us, for the purpose of regulating some matters relating to his mission. He set out on the first...

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