The Jew in London

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Page 229 - The idea that I am possessed with is that of restoring a political existence to my people, making them a nation again, giving them a national centre, such as the English have, though they too are scattered over the face of the globe.
Page 189 - ... so expended. These absences grew to such abnormal lengths that in the twelfth century it became necessary to protect the wife by limiting the absence to eighteen months — an interval which was only permitted to husbands who had obtained the formal sanction of the communal authorities. On his return the husband was compelled to remain at least six months with his family before again starting on his involuntary travels. During the first year of marriage it became a well-established rule of conduct...
Page 74 - Jewish tailors and their special methods into a new factory we had recently built, with satisfactory results. Their work has been excellent! British material has been used instead of German, and a large part of the money sent formerly to Berlin has been distributed among British manufacturers and in wages. 'The quality of the work has improved year by year, the garments made in our factory are better than those imported previously. 'Other English firms have followed our lead, and to-day the German...
Page 198 - Yes, you are our brothers and we will do our duty by you, but we wish you had not come to this country.
Page 189 - Wife - desertion was an evil which it was harder to deal with, for, owing to the unsettlement of Jewish life under continuous persecution, the husband was frequently bound to leave home in search of a livelihood, and, perhaps, to contract his services for long periods to foreign employers. The husband endeavoured to make ample provision for his wife's maintenance during his absence, or, if he failed to do so, the wife was supported at the public cost and the husband compelled to refund the sum so...
Page 162 - ... trust that moulded them into a people, whose life has made half the inspiration of the world. What is it to me that the ten tribes are lost untraceably, or that multitudes of the children of Judah have mixed themselves with the Gentile populations as a river with rivers ? Behold our people still! Their skirts spread afar; they are torn and soiled and trodden on ; but there is a jewelled breastplate. Let the wealthy men, the monarchs of commerce, the learned in all knowledge...
Page 75 - Ans. 18,963. money sent formerly to Berlin has been distributed among British manufacturers and in wages. The quality of the work has improved year by year ; the garments made in our factory are better than those imported previously. Other English firms have followed our lead, and to-day the German press admits the loss of her trade in those goods with England. Our experience shows that these foreign Jewish tailors do a class of work which our workers cannot undertake with success, and earn a high...
Page 74 - Dyche, an alien worker and writer, gives the results of their enterprise : — " In the year 1885 the demand for ladies' tailormade jackets came into vogue, and to meet the demand for our British and Colonial trade we were compelled to import large quantities of these garments from Germany. They were made of German materials by tailors in and around Berlin. We tried to produce these garments in our own factories, but without success ; our women workers were unable to manipulate the hand-irons used...
Page xxii - ... success which does not always follow mere technical education. He has dreams which he can enjoy in his hours of leisure without being driven to seek dreams through drunkenness. He has a sense of equality which gives him self-confidence, and enables him easily to take the place he gains in the world. He is very persistent. He endures hardships, and faces opposition, with a courageous perseverance. He takes up a new pursuit ; he enters new conditions of life ; he begins again and again after failures,...

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