The Journal of School Geography, Volume 1

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1897 - Geography
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Page 189 - For the recognition of the independence of the people of Cuba, demanding that the Government of Spain relinquish its authority and government in the island of Cuba, and to withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters, and directing the President of the United States to use the land and naval forces of the United States to carry these resolutions into effect...
Page 189 - Whenever any citizen of the United States discovers a deposit of guano on any island, rock, or key, not within the lawful jurisdiction of any other government, and not occupied by the citizens of any other government, and takes peaceable possession thereof, and occupies the same, such island, rock, or key may, at the discretion of the President, be considered as appertaining to the United States.
Page 182 - The Central Australian aborigine is the living representative of a stone age who still fashions his spear-heads and knives from flint or sandstone and performs the most daring surgical operations with them. His origin and history are lost in the gloomy mists of the past. He has no written records and few oral traditions. In appearance he is a naked, hirsute savage, with a type of features occasionally pronouncedly Jewish. He is by nature light-hearted, merry and prone to laughter, a splendid mimic,...
Page 44 - It was not until the early part of the eighteenth century that the flint-lock musket with a bayonet finally displaced the pike in the equipment of the infantry.
Page 3 - Geography is therefore concerned with two classes of facts and with the relations in which the two classes stand. The first class embraces all necessary facts about the inorganic earth — land, water, air— and about plants and animals considered as the non-human inhabitants of the earth ; the second includes the necessary facts as to the manner of man's living, from the savage to the civilized state, from wandering nomads to fixed populations, from the thieving of warfare to the competition of...
Page 250 - ... and drier lands, and the area of cultivation in the dry season under these conditions is hence largely diminished. If the winter rains are light and scanty, the crops are more or less severely affected on all the higher lands where irrigation from wells, &c., is necessarily limited. The rains of the wet season set in suddenly on the west coast of India in the first week of June, and a little later (in the second or third week of June) on the Bengal coast, and extend more or less rapidly into...
Page 10 - Pestalozzi knew less geography than a child in one of our primary schools; yet it was from him that I gained my chief knowledge of this science, for it was in listening to him that I first conceived the idea of the natural method. It was he who opened the way to me, and I take pleasure in attributing whatever value my work may possess entirely to him.
Page 249 - ... least two-thirds of India in the year 1896, it is necessary to bear in mind the more prominent features of its meteorology, that differ very largely from the meteorological conditions in European countries. The following is a brief statement of the chief features of the two monsoon periods in India. The year in India may be broadly divided into two seasons or monsoons — viz. the north-east monsoon and the south-west monsoon. These names are derived from the direction of the winds prevailing...
Page 190 - Veracruz, being absolutely void of safe harbors, compels me to again remind exporters to pack their goods more securely, so that they may stand the rough handling to which they are invariably subjected in their transfer from the ships to the lighters, by reason of the rough, open sea and the frequent "northers" which visit this coast during five months of each year. The merchants here are unanimous in their complaints regarding the careless manner in which all merchandise from the United States is...
Page 8 - Atlantic coast. This seaboard country presented in its different portions different aspects, which had a corresponding effect upon the colonists. In New England the lowland belt is only from fifty to eighty miles wide ; but it gradually broadens as it continues southward, till in the Carolinas the mountains are two hundred and fifty miles back from the sea. The area adapted to settlement was therefore more extensive in the South than in the North. Furthermore, the northern district had suffered glaciation...

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