The Judas Kiss

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Grove Press, 1998 - Drama - 115 pages
3 Reviews
Oscar Wilde's relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas has inspired contemporary writers for decades. In his account of love tested to destruction, David Hare presents his powerful interpretation of what may have happened behind closed doors between Wilde and Douglas. The Judas Kiss lays bare the drama of two critical moments in Wilde's last years: the day he decides to stay in England and face imprisonment, and the night after his release, two years later, when the lover for whom he risked and lost everything betrays him. The Judas Kiss presents the consequences of taking an uncompromisingly moral position in a world defined by fear, expedience, and conformity.
 

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User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

A play that depicts the day of Oscar Wilde's arrest in the first act, and the day his lover left in the second act. The dialogue is witty, as one would expect when you're using Wilde as a character ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Devil_llama - LibraryThing

A play that depicts the day of Oscar Wilde's arrest in the first act, and the day his lover left in the second act. The dialogue is witty, as one would expect when you're using Wilde as a character ... Read full review

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About the author (1998)

The son of Clifford and Agnes Gilmour Hare, David Hare was born on June 5, 1947, in St. Leonards, England. After graduating from Jesus College in Cambridge in 1968 with the honors Master of Arts degree in English, Hare went to work for the film company A.B. Pathe. Soon after, Hare co-founded the Portable Theatre Company, a touring experimental theatre group. While serving as the theatre's director from 1968 to 1971, Hare wrote his first plays. In 1970, Hare won the Evening Standard Drama Award for most promising new playwright for Slag, his first major play. Two years later, after Portable Theatre declared bankruptcy, Hare became resident dramatist at Nottingham Playhouse. Hare also co-founded the Joint Stock Theatre Group and served as its director from 1975 to 1980. During these years Hare produced many more plays, including The Great Exhibition, Brassneck, and Knuckle, the first of Hare's plays to be produced in London's West End. In addition to directing his own plays, Hare has directed such works as The Party by Trevor Griffiths, Devil's Island by Tony Bicat, and King Lear, with Anthony Hopkins in the title role. In 1982, Hare opened his own film company, Greenpoint Films. Among the screenplays written by Hare are Plenty, Paris by Night, and Wetherby, a story about repressed passions among members of the middle class.

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