The Kennedy Imprisonment: A Meditation on Power

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2002 - History - 310 pages
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From one of America's foremost historians, The Kennedy Imprisonment is the definitive historical and psychological analysis of the Kennedy clan. The winner of a Pulitzer Prize, Garry Wills reveals a family that enjoyed public adulation but provided fluctuating leadership, that experienced both unparalleled fame and odd failures, and whose basic values ensnared its men in their own myths of success and masculinity. In the end, Wills reveals that the the Kennedys' crippling conception of power touched every part of their public and private lives, including their relationships with women and world leaders. Sometimes gossipy, sometimes philosophical, The Kennedy Imprisonment is a book that is as true, insightful, and relevant as ever.
 

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User Review  - Arkrayder - LibraryThing

I received a copy of this book from NetGalley and Mariner Books in exchange for a fair and honest review. Thank you! This book an interesting look into the Kennedy family, especially John and Robert ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Father
15
The President
27
Sisters and Wives
39
The Prisoner of Sex
51
FAMILY
59
SemiIrish
61
SemiEnglish
72
Honorary Kennedys
84
Enjoy Enjoy
175
Delegitimation
188
Veralltaglichung
199
The Prisoner of Charisma
207
Bulldog Bulldog
219
The Midas Touch
232
Learning
242
Triumph
255

Ghosts
99
The Prisoner of Family
111
Creating the Kennedys
127
Style
140
The Prisoner of Image
151
Counterinsurgency at Home
163
Restraint
264
Charismatic Nation
275
The Prisoner of Power
286
Brotherhood
297
Index
305
Copyright

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Page xiii - The display of boats which attended and joined us on this occasion, some with vocal and some with instrumental music on board ; the decorations of the ships, the roar of cannon, and the loud acclamations of the people which rent the skies, as I passed along the wharves, filled my mind with sensations as painful (considering the reverse of this scene, which may be the case after all my labors to do good) as they are pleasing.
Page 13 - Sexuality must not be described as a stubborn drive, by nature alien and of necessity disobedient to a power which exhausts itself trying to subdue it and often fails to control it entirely. It appears rather as an especially dense transfer point for relations of power...

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About the author (2002)

GARRY WILLS, a distinguished historian and critic, is the author of numerous books, including the Pulitzer Prize–winning Lincoln at Gettysburg, Saint Augustine, and the best-selling Why I Am a Catholic.
A regular contributor to the New York Review of Books, he has won many awards, among them two National Book Critics Circle Awards and the 1998 National Medal for the Humanities. He is a history professor emeritus at Northwestern University.

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