The Kitchen God's Wife

Front Cover
Penguin, 2006 - Fiction - 415 pages
2 Reviews

Winnie and Helen have kept each other's worst secrets for more than fifty years. Now, because she believes she is dying, Helen wants to expose everything. And Winnie angrily determines that she must be the one to tell her daughter, Pearl, about the past—including the terible truth even Helen does not know. And so begins Winnie's story of her life on a small island outside Shanghai in the 1920s, and other places in China during World War II, and traces the happy and desperate events tha led to Winnie's coming to America in 1949.

 

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Although this begins and ends among the Chinese Americans in California, the bulk of this story is set in mid-twentieth century China. Winnie tells her life story to her grown daughter—a story of a ... Read full review

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I am an avid reader and this book is at the top of my list of all time favorites. Ms.Tan is an excellent writer and very well informed about her subject since it is her mother's true story. A rare glimpse into history, war and Chineese culture it made me laugh out loud and it made me cry. I am a wiser, better person for having read it all those years ago. 

Contents

Section 1
ii
Section 2
74
Section 3
87
Section 4
110
Section 5
131
Section 6
152
Section 7
164
Section 8
177
Section 13
268
Section 14
299
Section 15
313
Section 16
332
Section 17
347
Section 18
358
Section 19
364
Section 20
383

Section 9
190
Section 10
206
Section 11
218
Section 12
236
Section 21
397
Section 22
411
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About the author (2006)

Amy Tan is the author of The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God's Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, The Bonesetter's Daughter, The Opposite of Fate, Saving Fish from Drowning, and two children's books, The Moon Lady and The Chinese Siamese Cat, which has been adapted as Sagwa, a PBS series for children. Tan was also the co-producer and co-screenwriter of the film version of The Joy Luck Club, and her essays and stories have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies. Her work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. Tan, who has a master's degree in linguistics from San Jose University, has worked as a language specialist to programs serving children with developmental disabilities. She lives with her husband in San Francisco and New York.

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