The Kundalini Concept: Its Origin and Value

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Jain Publishing Company, Aug 1, 2007 - Philosophy - 274 pages
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"It is very important that we come to a clear understanding of what kundalini is and what it is not. This becomes especially important in the light of the greatly increased interest in the West in the practice of various kinds of yogas. Much harm can come in the attempts to 'arouse kundalini' if there is not the corresponding practice of progressive freedom from egocentrism. Mary Scott has done an admirable job in clarifying the subject by delving into the context in which the notions of kundalini and chakras were developed. In addition to the sympathetic reading of Aurobindo and Woodroffe, who seems to have been one of the few Westerners who tried to understand the Tantras in their Indian expositions as expounded by the Tantrik masters themselves rather than impose extraneous theories of one's own, the author brings a great deal of common sense and her own personal experience of being a searcher as well as a psychotherapist. If taken seriously, this book should provide a great challenge to the general methodology of contemporary sciences. Highly recommended for scholars and lay persons alike." --Prof. Ravi Ravindra
 

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