The Labour Party and Taxation: Party Identity and Political Purpose in Twentieth-Century Britain

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 25, 2001 - History - 294 pages
This is a political history of Labour's use of the tax system from 1906 to 1979: an epilogue brings the story up to the present, surveying New Labour's tax policies and dilemmas. Richard Whiting's broad-ranging, lucid and readable study examines how Labour used tax to further its political aims of funding welfare, managing the economy, promoting fairness and achieving greater equality. Whiting also shows the limits of Labour's ability to achieve a more equal society in this way, assesses the ability and standing of key figures in the Labour movement, and delineates the problems caused by the political role of the trade unions. This study provides an original perspective on Labour's history, and is a valuable contribution to understanding both the tax structure and the politics of twentieth-century Britain more generally.
 

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Contents

Taxation and political debate
1
1 Struggles within a liberal inheritance 19061940
8
2 The changing balance of tax interests 19401954
61
3 The Kaldor era 19511965
130
4 Social democracy examined 19651970
173
5 Defensive positions 19701979
214
New Labour old problems?
259
7 Conclusion
269
Select bibliography
274
Index
287
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About the author (2001)

Richard Whiting is Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of Leeds.

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