The Legacy: Tradition and Innovation in Northwest Coast Indian Art

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Royal BC Museum, 2007 - Art - 193 pages
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A classic book on First Nations art and culture is back in print. "The Legacy" is so much more than an elegant art book. It is a delightful and informative guide to the continuing First Nations artistic traditions. A spectacular selection of colour photographs displays the work of 40 artists, and the authors present a detailed analysis of the culture that inspired their work. The authors also discuss the social function of the artists' work, and the different styles, techniques and materials used to create them. The book is based on an exhibition of the same name that travelled throughout BC and Canada and to the United Kingdom in the 1970s and early 1980s. The exhibition helped bring world-wide attention to Northwest Coast First Nations art. The first edition of the book was published in 1980, and in its Foreword, R Yorke Edwards, then Director of the BC Provincial Museum, says: "The Legacy has refused to stay on our store-room shelves. This book will ensure that it remains accessible in printed form to a wide audience for many years." Prophetic words -- for this book has been reprinted a dozen times and sold over 25,000 copies. "The Legacy" has become an enduring tribute to the continuing tradition of Northwest Coast First Nations art, and remains an important guide for scholars and art lovers. This new edition includes updates to the artists' biographies and First Nations' names.

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About the author (2007)

Peter L. Macnair is former curator of ethnology at the Royal BC Museum, a post he held for more than 30 years. He is widely recognized for his knowledge of the art and history of the First Nations of the Northwest Coast.

Alan L. Hoover worked in the RBCM's anthropology collections for 33 years and retired in 2003, as manager of the department.

Kevin Neary is a consultant in anthropology, research and museum interpretation for many First Nations and cultural institutions in British Columbia. He has participated in several research projects with the Huu-ay-aht over the past 20 years, developing a warm appreciation for Huu-ay-aht people, culture, language and history.

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