The Legend of the King

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Sep 13, 2010 - Juvenile Fiction - 304 pages
2 Reviews

In this final installment of the Squire's Tale series, Terence and his fellow Knights of the Round Table must come together in a last stand to save Camelot. The characters Gerald Morris has brought to life throughout his series—“Terence and Gawain, Lynet and Gaheris, Luneta and Rhience, Dinadan and Palomides"—each have an important role to play in this climactic final conflict. Maintaining their faith, selflessness, and honor, Arthur's court bands together to try to defeat Morgause and Mordred and banish the dark magic from England forever.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - themulhern - LibraryThing

It would be better if the author had stopped the series while he was ahead. To achieve his ending he has to allow a lot of carnage while at the same time being hopeful. This really trivializes the ... Read full review

THE LEGEND OF THE KING

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Morris pulls off a spectacular conclusion to his humane and witty Squire's Tales series as destructive intrigues both provide a backdrop for a fan-pleasing reunion of favorite figures from past ... Read full review

Contents

1 The Messengers
1
2 The Mission
25
3 The Trap
43
4 The Siege
63
5 Questing
89
6 The Trial
112
7 A Love Story
130
8 The Titans
158
10 The Pilgrimage
209
11 Barham Down
229
12 The Beginning of the Story
258
Envoi
283
A Cast of Characters
286
Back Flap
297
Back Cover
298
Spine
299

9 The Last Enchantress
185

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About the author (2010)

When Gerald Morris was in fifth grade he loved Greek and Norse mythology and before long was retelling the stories to his younger sister and then to neighborhood kids. He began carrying a notebook in which he kept some of the details related to the different stories. The joy he found in retelling those myths continued when he discovered other stories. According to Gerald Morris, “I never lost my love of retelling the old stories. When I found Arthurian literature, years later, I knew at once that I wanted to retell those grand tales. So I pulled out my notebook . . . I retell the tales, peopling them with characters that I at least find easier to recognize, and let the magic of the Arthurian tradition go where it will.” Gerald Morris lives in Wausau, Wisconsin, with his wife and their three children. In addition to writing he serves as a minister in a church.

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