The Life, Trial and Conversations of Robert Emmet, Leader of the Irish Insurrection of 1803: Also, the Celeberated Speech Made by Him on the Occasion

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R.Coddington, 1845
 

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Page 113 - My lords, it may be a part of the system of angry justice to bow a man's mind by humiliation to the proposed ignominy of the scaffold ; but worse to me than the purposed shame, or the scaffold's terrors, would be the shame of such foul and unfounded imputations as have been laid against me in this court. You, my lord, are a judge ; I am the supposed...
Page 84 - ... so touching, it breathed forth such a soul of wretchedness, that she drew a crowd mute and silent around her, and melted every one into tears. The story of one so true and tender could not but excite great interest in a country remarkable for enthusiasm.
Page 82 - When every worldly maxim arrayed itself against him; when blasted in fortune, and disgrace and danger darkened around his name, she loved him the more ardently for his very sufferings. If then his fate could awaken the sympathy even of his foes, what must have been the agony of her whose whole soul was occupied by his image!
Page 115 - I am charged with being an emissary of France! An emissary of France! And for what end? It is alleged that I wished to sell the independence of my country! And for what end?
Page 1 - OH, BREATHE NOT HIS NAME I— Moore. Oh, breathe not his name ! let it sleep in the shade, Where cold and unhonoured his relics are laid ; Sad, silent, and dark, be the tears that we shed, As the night-dew that falls on the grass o'er his head.
Page 82 - ... unfortunate attachment, and was an exile from the paternal roof. But could the sympathy and kind offices of friends have reached a spirit so shocked and driven in by horror, she would have experienced no want of consolation, for the Irish are a people of quick and generous sensibilities.
Page 84 - ... irrevocably engrossed by the memory of her former lover. He, however, persisted in his suit. He solicited not her tenderness, but her esteem. He was assisted by her conviction of his worth, and her sense of her own destitute and dependent situation, for she was existing on the kindness of friends. In a word, he at length succeeded in gaining her hand, though with the solemn assurance that her heart was unalterably another's.
Page 81 - She is far from the land where her young hero sleeps, And lovers around her are sighing; But coldly she turns from their gaze, and weeps, For her heart in his grave is lying.
Page 118 - I am accountable for all the blood that has, and will be shed in this struggle of the oppressed against the oppressor, shall you tell me this.... and must I be so very a slave as not to repel it...
Page 118 - Let no man dare, when I am dead, to charge me with dishonour ; let no man attaint my memory by believing that I could have engaged in any cause but that of my country's liberty and independence...

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