The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, 1. köide

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James Cochrane, 1832 - 357 pages
 

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Page 269 - Shall we for ever make new books, as apothecaries make new mixtures, by pouring only out of one vessel into another? Are we for ever to be twisting, and untwisting the same rope? for ever in the same track — for ever at the same pace?
Page 336 - A sick brother officer should have the best quarters, Trim, and if we had him with us, — we could tend and look to him: Thou art an excellent nurse thyself, Trim, — and what with thy care of him, and the old woman's, and his boy's, and mine together, we might recruit him again at once, and set him upon his legs. In a fortnight or three weeks, added my uncle Toby, smiling, — he might march. He will never march, an...
Page 80 - IMAGINE to yourself a little squat, uncourtly figure of a Doctor Slop, of about four feet and a half perpendicular height, with a breadth of back, and a sesquipedality of belly, which might have done honour to a serjeant in the horse-guards.
Page 413 - tis an animal (be in what hurry I may) I cannot bear to strike there is a patient endurance of sufferings, wrote so unaffectedly in his looks and carriage, which pleads so mightily for him, that it always disarms me ; and to that degree, that I do not like to speak unkindly to him : on the contrary, meet him where I will — whether in town or country — in cart or under panniers — whether in liberty or bondage...
Page 337 - There was a frankness in my uncle Toby— not the effect of familiarity, but the cause of it — which let you at once into his soul, and showed you the goodness of his nature ; to this there was something in his looks, and voice, and manner superadded, which eternally beckoned to the unfortunate to come and take shelter under him...
Page 123 - A MAN'S body and his mind, with the utmost reverence to both I speak it, are exactly like a jerkin, and a jerkin's lining; — rumple the one, you rumple the other.
Page 330 - ... twill be enough to give your honour your death, and bring on your honour's torment in your groin. I fear so, replied my uncle Toby; but I am not at rest in my mind, Trim, since the account the landlord has given me. I wish I had not known so much of this affair, — added my uncle Toby, — or that I had known more of it: How shall we manage it?
Page 475 - Where slaves once more their native land behold, No fiends torment, no Christians thirst for gold. To Be, contents his natural desire, He asks no Angel's wing, no Seraph's fire; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company.
Page 133 - We excommunicate and anathematize him; and from the thresholds of the holy church of God Almighty we sequester him, that he maybe tormented, disposed, and delivered over with Dathan and Abiram, and with those who say unto the Lord God, ' depart from us, we desire none of thy ways.
Page 337 - My uncle Toby went to his bureau, put his purse into his breeches pocket, and, having ordered the Corporal to go early in the morning for a physician, he went to bed and fell asleep.

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