The Life and Reflections of Charles Observator: In which are Displayed, the Real Characters of Human Life

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Rowe & Hooper, 1816 - Christian ethics - 271 pages
 

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Page 2 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 111 - She riseth also while it is yet night and giveth meat to her household, and a portion to her maidens.
Page 111 - She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness. Her children rise up and call her blessed ; her husband also, and he praiseth her.
Page 152 - I was hungry, and ye gave me meat; thirsty, and ye gave me drink; naked, and ye clothed me; a stranger, and ye took me in.
Page 111 - She is not afraid of the snow for her household, for all her household are clothed with scarlet. She maketh herself coverings of tapestry, her clothing is silk and purple.
Page 32 - Christian world, allow sufficient time for this, if men would but apply themselves to it with half so much zeal and diligence as they do to the trifles and amusements of this life, and it would turn to infinitely better account. Thus it appears to be the necessary duty...
Page 222 - In the multitude of words there wanteth not sin : but he that refraineth his lips is wise.
Page 31 - No man is obliged to learn and know every thing ; this can neither be sought nor required, for it is utterly impossible : yet all persons are under some obligation to improve their own understanding; otherwise it will be a barren desert, or a forest overgrown with weeds and brambles. Universal ignorance or infinite errors will overspread the mind which is utterly neglected, and lies without any cultivation.
Page 31 - Watts, is obliged to learn and know every thing ; this can neither be sought nor required, for it is utterly impossible : yet all persons are under some obligation to improve their own understanding, otherwise it will be a barren desert, or a forest overgrown with weeds and brambles. Universal ignorance, or infinite error, will overspread the mind which is utterly neglected and lies without any cultivation.
Page 32 - It is in vain for any to say, we have no leisure or time for it. The daily intervals of time and vacancies from necessary labour, together with the one day in seven in the Christian world...

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