The Life of Akoa-Mongo Kara from Africa to the United States, Maine: And a Story Covering 14 Generations of an African Family

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Trafford Publishing, Dec 30, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 352 pages
This book is an excellent tool to learn how people used to live in Central Africa around 1960 when many African countries started to become politically independent. One would learn how people lived, worked, socialized, traveled, took care of themselves when sick, the children and women contributing to the family economy, the system of education, family ties, territorial occupations, tribal relations, language formations, and settlements of the population.. He would also learn what happened from around 1954 concerning the struggles for independence, and the first leaders of African nations. One would also learn about the difficulties of going to school, getting good health care, Black and White relations, and discrimination in reverse, difficulties of making a living, Christianity, paganism, and poverty. Concerning the United States, one will learn about problems foreigners face in the United States in order to be acclimated, and acculturated, differences in culture, eating habits, weather, language, socialization, help for the poor, the role of church, education opportunities, humanitarian and Christian love, relations between Blacks from Africa, and African Americans, between Africans living in the States and those at home, problems between those living in the States, problems of alienation of most children of the second generation of the immigrates. This book deals with men and women issues, Christian religion, paganism, and faith in God, the love of God, and serving others as a result of what God has done in someones life. This book is easy to read. It is good for those who would like to learn about African culture and people, the way others look at and see Americans; things to learn from each other as groups of people living in the same environment. Young people, families, churches, schools, anthropologists, sociologists, and political scientists may use this book. These are wishes of the author, Franois K. Akoa-Mongo
 

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I am named In the book and I can honestly say the information mentioned about me and my family is one sided to highlight the author. He tilted storied and blanetly lied. From the fact the church had no bibles to the fact we helped him get hired and we told him who to friend. He damaged our property at the church clean up and his teaching at the school was affected drastically by his opinion of my family to the point the school dropped the requirement that the had to take a speech class to graduate. i wish my name could be removed from the book cause I do not want any connection to his fable of life .  

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I am mentioned in this book and it is not a factual representation of what actually happened. He is elevating himself and leaving out the hurtful things he has said and done.

Contents

PART I
1
PART II
91
PART III
135
PART IV
201
PART V
267
PART VI
279
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About the author (2010)

The Rev. Franšois Kara Akoa-Mongo was born and grew up in Cameroon. He is the seventh child of ten born from his father, the Rev. Franšois Akoa Ab˘m˘, and his mother, Dj˘m˘ Ess˘mba Suzanne. He is an ordained minister of the Presbyterian Church of Cameroon, the church he served in many qualities for many years. He taught Social Studies, and Foreign Languages ( French, Spanish, and Latin) at Washington Academy and Narraguagus High School. He also taught some classes as an Adjunct at the University of Maine at Machias. He and his wife Kathy have raised their 9 children, who live in New England. He holds the Master of Divinity, the Master of Teaching Foreign Languages, and a Doctor of Education in Social Studies. He will soon publish soon, his 150 sermons preached at Machiasport, Maine, a book of Meditation in French for married Christian couples, and a Christian Hymnbook translated into his mother’s Cameroonian dialect.

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