The Life of Jonathan Swift, Dean of St. Patrick's, Dublin

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J. Murray, 1882 - Authors, Irish - 576 pages
 

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Page 403 - Because I have called and ye refused; I have stretched out my hand, and no man regarded; But ye have set at nought all my counsel, and would none of my reproof: I also will laugh at your calamity: I will mock when your fear cometh...
Page 127 - Pray, sir, do you remember any good weather in the world?' The country gentleman, after staring a little at the singularity of his manner, and the oddity of the question, answered, ' Yes, sir, I thank God I remember a great deal of good weather in my time.
Page 478 - If you see this matter in the same light that it appears to me, I hope you will burn this and pardon me for giving you so much trouble about an impracticable thing ; but, if you think there is a probability of obtaining the favour asked, I am sure your humanity, and propensity to relieve merit in distress, will incline you to serve the poor man, without my adding any more to the trouble I have already given you, than assuring you that I am, with great truth, Sir, " Your faithful servant,
Page 332 - I do profess without affectation, that your kind opinion of me as a patriot, since you call it so, is what I do not deserve; because what I do is owing to perfect rage and resentment, and the mortifying sight of slavery, folly, and baseness about me, among which I am forced to live.
Page 483 - I have been very miserable all night, and to-day extremely deaf and full of pain. I am so stupid and confounded, that I cannot express the mortification I am under both in body and mind. All I can say is, that I am not in torture ; but I daily and hourly expect it. Pray let me know how your health is, and your family. I hardly understand one word I write. I am sure my days will be very few ; few and miserable they must be. I am, for those few days, Yours- entirely, J. SWIFT. If I do not blunder,...
Page 312 - To like with less seraphic ends ; Or, to compound the business, whether They temper love and books together ; Must never to mankind be told, Nor shall the conscious Muse unfold.
Page 406 - I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London that a young, healthy child well nursed is, at a year old, . a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled; and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee or a ragout.
Page 286 - I believe sleep was never more welcome to a weary traveller, than death was to her...
Page 464 - For we know by these marks the place of the damn'd : And HELL to be sure is at Paris or Rome. How happy for us that it is not at home ! THE DAY OF JUDGMENT.
Page 387 - In the Attic commonwealth,* it was the privilege and birth-right of every citizen and poet to rail aloud, and in public...

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