The London Hanged: Crime and Civil Society in the Eighteenth Century

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Verso, 2003 - History - 492 pages
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"Peter Linebaugh's groundbreaking history has become an inescapable part of any understanding of the rise of capitalism. In eighteenth-century London the spectacle of a hanging was not simply a form of punishing transgressors. Rather it evidently served the more sinister purpose -- for a privileged ruling class -- of forcing the poor population of London to accept the criminalization of customary rights and new forms of private property. Necessity drove the city's poor into inevitable conflict with the changing property laws such that all the working-class men and women of London had good reason to fear the example of Tyburn's triple tree.In this new edition Peter Linebaugh reinforces his original arguments with responses to his critics based on an impressive array of historical sources. As the trend of capital punishment intensifies with the spread of global capitalism, The London Hanged also gains in contemporary relevance." -- Publisher.
 

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The London Hanged: Crime and Civil Society in the Eighteenth Century

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In 18th-century Britain, most victims of capital punishment were hanged for property crimes--some as petty as the pilfering of spoons. A brutal and benighted age, we like to think, but to the author ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER Two Old Mr Gory and the Thanatocracy
42
The Sociology of
74
The Pedagogy of the Gallows under Mercantilism
113
CHAPTER FIVE Socking the Hogshead and Excise
153
Highway
184
Industry and Idleness in the Period of Manufacture 175076
219
CHAPTER EIGHT Silk Makes the Difference
256
CHAPTER NINE If You Plead for Your Life Plead
288
The Crisis of Thanatocracy in the Era
327
Technological
371
The London
402
AFTERWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
443
INDEX
483
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Peter Linebaugh is Professor of History at the University of Toledo. He writes extensively on British history, Irish history, labor history and the history of the colonial Atlantic. His books include The Magna Carta Manifesto, The Many-Headed Hydra and The London Hanged, and he contributes frequently to CounterPunch.

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