The London Stage: A Collection of the Most Reputed Tragedies, Comedies, Operas, Melo-dramas, Farces, and Interludes. Accurately Printed from Acting Copies as Performed at the Theatres Royal and Carefully Collated and Revised, Volume 2

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Page 31 - Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man. Eternity ! thou pleasing, dreadful thought ! Through what variety of untried being, Through what new scenes and changes must we pass ! The wide, the unbounded prospect lies before me ; But shadows, clouds, and darkness rest upon it.
Page 31 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Page 31 - It must be so — Plato, thou reasonest well ; Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into nought ? Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? Tis the divinity that stirs within us ; 'Tis heaven itself, that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man...
Page 40 - Thou mad'st me what I am, with all the spirit, Aspiring thoughts and elegant desires That fill the happiest man ? Ah ! rather why Didst thou not form me sordid as my fate, Base-minded, dull, and fit to carry burdens? Why have I sense to know the curse that's on me? Is this just dealing. Nature ? Belvidera ! Enter BELVIDERA.
Page 31 - The wide, the unbounded prospect, lies before me; But shadows, clouds, and darkness rest upon it. Here will I hold. If there's a power above us (And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works) he must delight in virtue; And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page 40 - Still vex your councils, shake your public safety, And make the robes of government you. wear Hateful to you, as these base chains to me. Duke. Pardon, or death ? Pierre.
Page 18 - Oh, do not look so tenderly upon me. Let indignation lighten from your eyes, and blast me ere you die. — By heaven, he weeps, in pity of my woes. Tears, — tears, for blood.
Page 52 - Plucking ripe clusters from the tender shoots ; Their port was more than human, as they stood : I took it for a faery vision Of some gay creatures of the element, That in the colours of the rainbow live, And play i
Page 40 - No more. I charge thee keep this secret close; Clear up thy sorrows, look as if thy wrongs Were all forgot, and treat him like a friend, As no complaint were made. No more; retire, Retire, my life, and doubt not of my honour; I'll heal its failings and deserve thy love. BELV. Oh, should I part with thee, I fear thou wilt In anger leave me, and return no more.
Page 51 - We, that are of purer fire, Imitate the starry quire; Who, in their nightly watchful spheres, Lead in swift round the months and years.

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