The Long-legged House

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Shoemaker & Hoard, 2004 - Literary Collections - 213 pages
3 Reviews
First published in 1969 and out of print for more than twenty-five years, The Long-Legged House was award-winner Wendell Berry's first collection of essays, the inaugural work introducing many of the central issues that have occupied him over the course of his career. Three essays at the heart of this volume??The Rise,” ?The Long-Legged House,” and ?A Native Hill”?are essays of homecoming and memoir, as the writer finds his home place, his native ground, his place on earth. As he later wrote, ?What I stand for is what I stand on,” and here we see him beginning the acts of rediscovery and resettling. This volume contains original contents, with only slight revisions as might be desired. It gives readers the opportunity to read the work of this remarkable cultural critic and agrarian, and to delight in the prose of one of America's greatest stylists.

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User Review  - Aspenhugger - LibraryThing

"First published in 1969 and out of print for more than twenty-five years, The Long-Legged House was Wendell Berry's first collection of essays, the inaugural work introducing many of the central ... Read full review

The Long Legged House

User Review  - luvagoodbook - Overstock.com

We looked for this book a long time before finally finding it at Overstock. We love the essays and find that they are as pertinent today as they were when written. The book is in very good condition and arrived very quickly. Read full review

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References to this book

A Christian Theology of Place
John Inge
No preview available - 2003
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About the author (2004)

Wendell Berry The prolific poet, novelist, and essayist Wendell Berry is a fifth-generation native of north central Kentucky. Berry taught at Stanford University; traveled to Italy and France on a Guggenheim Fellowship; and taught at New York University and the University of Kentucky, Lexington, before moving to Henry County. Berry owns and operates Lanes Landing Farm, a small, hilly piece of property on the Kentucky River. He embraced full-time farming as a career, using horses and organic methods to tend the land. Harmony with nature in general, and the farming tradition in particular, is a central theme of Berry's diverse work. As a poet, Berry gained popularity within the literary community. Collected Poems, 1957-1982, was particularly well-received. Novels and short stories set in Port William, a fictional town paralleling his real-life home town of Port Royal further established his literary reputation. The Memory of Old Jack, Berry's third novel, received Chicago's Friends of American Writers Award for 1975. Berry reached his broadest audience and attained his greatest popular acclaim through his essays. The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture is a springboard for contemporary environmental concerns. In his life as well as his art, Berry has advocated a responsible, contextual relationship with individuals in a local, agrarian economy.

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