The Love of Parson Lord and Other Stories

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Page 239 - ... the fun borders on the tragic so closely that the dividing line between laughter and tears almost fades out of sight. — Brooklyn Eagle. FROM A GIRL'S POINT OF VIEW. The author is so good-humored, quaint, and clever that she has not left a dull page in her book. — Saturday Evening Gazette, Boston. A LITTLE SISTER TO THE WILDERNESS. A Novel. New Edition. Written from the heart and with rare sympathy. . . . The writer has a natural and fluent style, and her dialect has the double excellence...
Page 208 - The Lord knows it ain't, Narcissa," William broke out with pathetic pride. " I know that as well as you do. You thought we'd put it in the bank for a rainy day, in case mother got feeble, or anything, and that is all you did think. Maybe I'd ought to. I s'pose I had, but I ain't going to. I 'ain't never done anything my whole life that I thought I ought not to do, but now I'm goin
Page 237 - Ornamental, 75 cents. The only criticism that can be made is one of eulogism, first for the perception of the artistic finish, and next for the pathos, tenderness, and grace employed in the illuminating of one great momentous truth. This book of Annie Trumbull Slosson's ought to give comfort to many a vexed and erring soul.
Page 240 - London. AUNT ANNE. A Novel. Post 8vo, Cloth, $1 25. There are in fiction few characters more consistently and powerfully set forth ; in its way this piece of work is perfection. The study is so remarkable that it is hard to believe that it is not from life.— NT Tribune.
Page 230 - I've been wasteful an' extravagant an' — There was a gentleman beautifully dressed who sat at our table, an' he talked real pleasant about the weather, an' — I got to thinking about him a little. Of course I didn't like him as well as you, William, for what comes first comes last with all our folks, but somehow he seemed to be kind of a part of the good time. I sha'n't never see him again, an...
Page 239 - Boston. A LITTLE SISTER TO THE WILDERNESS. A Novel. New Edition. Written from the heart and with rare sympathy. . . . The writer has a natural and fluent style, and her dialect has the double excellence of being novel and scanty. The scenes are picturesque and diversified. — Churchman, NY THE UNDER SIDE OF THINGS. A Novel. With a Portrait of the Author. This is a tenderly beautiful story. . . . This book is Miss Bell's best effort, and most in the line of what we hope to see her proceed in, dainty...
Page 13 - She gazed at the boy with an utter calmness and unconsciousness of scrutiny, as if he were something inanimate. Indeed, to this young Love, with her perfect innocence of ignorance and the long training of her mind on spiritual lines, a boy did not mean as much as a girl, nor much more than a rose-bush or an apple-tree. Richard, as if something in himself, of which he had not known, was discovered by her gaze, looked away with a great blush, and then Love turned her eyes from him towards his grandmother....
Page 136 - I wanted to fill her mind with such a pure ideal that there could be no danger. I endeavored in those letters to show what a man worthy of her affection should be, that she might love no other.
Page 45 - ... dull, wore a look of rapture, as he paced the tortuous garden paths, Love's blue flounces rustling against him, no matter how far she shrank away, the pungent odor of the rank box, which was waist-high in places, in his nostrils, and now and then, like the melody triumphing over the swell of the bass, a breath of lavender from Love's garments. They threaded the green maze of the garden, Richard more adoring at every step; he held Love's parasol jealously between her face and the sun. It would...
Page 68 - ... Why not?" demanded Richard. "Why not, sweetheart?" " Father — father has vowed — He does not wish me to marry, Richard." "Well, marry you will, nevertheless, sweetheart." " Never without his consent. I cannot, Richard." "With or without, you shall marry me, Love ; but he will consent." " Oh, he will not, unless — " Love looked with sudden courage in his face. " Oh," she whispered — " oh, Richard, if you would only be a missionary !" Richard Pierce laughed so loud that the gay ring of...

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