The Man Who Broke Purple

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A&C Black, Oct 28, 2011 - Fiction - 240 pages
Purple

The Code used by the Japanese prior to the bombing of Pearl Harbour . . . Did the Americans have advance information of the devastation to come? Had they cracked
Purple . . ?

Colonel William Friedman was 'the man who broke purple': this fascinating new biography of the world's greatest cryptographer reveals many new facts of the intriguing 'secret war' carried on by Intelligence departments in many countries.
 

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Contents

Introduction
Initiation
From ArttoCraft
The MovetoWashington
Challenge i The breaking
Secret Missions
12
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Ronald Clark (1916-1987) born in London and educated at King's College School. In 1933 he chose journalism as a career. During the Second World War, after being turned down for military duty on medical grounds, he served as a war correspondent. During this time Clark landed on Juno Beach with the Canadians on D-Day and followed the war until it's end, then remained in Germany to report on the major War Crimes trials.

Clark returned to Britain in 1948 and wrote extensively on subjects ranging from mountain climbing to the atomic bomb, Balmoral Castle to world explorers. He also wrote a number of biographies on a myriad of figures, such as: Charles Darwin, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, Sigmund Freud, and Bertrand Russell.

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