The Mechanic's Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal and Gazette, Volume 43

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Robertson, 1845
 

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Page 327 - The Baconian constructs a diving-bell, goes down in it, and returns with the most precious effects from the wreck. It would be easy to multiply illustrations of the difference between the philosophy of thorns and the philosophy of fruit, the philosophy of words and the philosophy of works.
Page 342 - And, as occasion served, would quote, No matter whether right or wrong; They might be either said or sung. His notions fitted things so well, That which was which he could not tell, But oftentimes mistook the one For th" other, as great clerks have done.
Page 327 - ... to his whole system, and that he used means different from those used by other philosophers, because he wished to arrive at an end altogether different from theirs. What then was the end which Bacon proposed to himself? It was, to use his own emphatic expression,
Page 327 - We have three others that do execute the experiments so directed, and report them. These we call inoculators. Lastly, we have three that raise the former discoveries by experiments into greater observations, axioms, and aphorisms. These we call interpreters of nature.
Page 327 - We have also engine-houses, where are prepared engines and instruments for all sorts of motions. There we imitate and practise to make swifter motions than any you have, either out of your muskets or any engine that you have...
Page 315 - ... whole being constructed, arranged, and combined, in the manner and for the purpose herein set forth.
Page 327 - We have three that try new experiments. Such as themselves think good. These we call pioneers or miners. We have three that draw the experiments of the former four into titles and tables, to give the better light for the drawing of observations and axioms out of them. These we call compilers.
Page 327 - And this we do also: we have consultations, which of the inventions and experiences which we have discovered shall be published, and which not: and take all an oath of secrecy for the concealing of those which we think fit to keep secret: though some of those we do reveal sometimes to the State, and some not.
Page 64 - After these remarks you will perceive that it is no exaggeration to say, we may fairly judge of the commercial prosperity of a country from the amount of sulphuric acid it consumes.
Page 122 - The surface of a sphere is equal to the convex surface of the circumscribing cylinder ; and the solidity of the sphere is two thirds the solidity of the circumscribing cylinder.

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