The Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, Volume 43

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M. Salmon, 1845 - Industrial arts
 

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Page 347 - ... shut up, intercourse suspended, the sick abandoned, mothers weeping in terror over their children. The Stoic assures the dismayed population that there is nothing bad in the small-pox, and that to a wise man disease, deformity, death, the loss of friends, are not evils. The Baconian takes out a lancet and begins to vaccinate.
Page 347 - The Baconian constructs a diving-bell, goes down in it, and returns with the most precious effects from the wreck. It would be easy to multiply illustrations of the difference between the philosophy of thorns and the philosophy of fruit, the philosophy of words and the philosophy of works.
Page 344 - Then after divers meetings and consults of our whole number, to consider of the former labours and collections, we have three that take care, out of them, to direct new experiments, of a higher light, more penetrating into nature than the former. These we call lamps..
Page 347 - What then was the end which Bacon proposed to himself? It was, to use his own emphatic expression, " fruit." It was the multiplying of human enjoyments and the mitigating of human sufferings. It was
Page 344 - We have also engine-houses, where are prepared engines and instruments for all sorts of motions. There we imitate and practise to make swifter motions than any you have, either out of your muskets or any engine that you have...
Page 344 - We have three that try new experiments. Such as themselves think good. These we call pioneers or miners. We have three that draw the experiments of the former four into titles and tables, to give the better light for the drawing of observations and axioms out of them. These we call compilers.
Page 345 - And this we do also: we have consultations, which of the inventions and experiences which we have discovered shall be published, and which not: and take all an oath of secrecy for the concealing of those which we think fit to keep secret: though some of those we do reveal sometimes to the State, and some not.
Page 122 - The surface of a sphere is equal to the convex surface of the circumscribing cylinder ; and the solidity of the sphere is two thirds the solidity of the circumscribing cylinder.
Page 317 - ... whole being constructed, arranged, and combined, in the manner and for the purpose herein set forth.
Page 74 - ... weight when their shafts were uniform ; and that columns tapering from the bottom to the top were only capable of bearing weights due to the smallest part of their section, though the larger end might serve to prevent lateral thrusts. This last remark applies, too, to the Egyptian columns, the strength of the column being only that of the smallest part of the section. From the two series of experiments, it appeared that the strength of the short column is nearly in proportion to the area of the...

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