The Meigs Railway: The Reason for Its Departures from the Ordinary Practice. Its Departures, and how and why a Safe Railway is Possible

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C.H. Whiting, 1887 - Railroads, Elevated - 182 pages
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Page 13 - With- so radical a departure from the ordinary mode of applying locomotive power, it is only to be expected that perfect proportions will develop slowly and out of the results of extended use or practical experiments. This is but the usual rule applying to all inventions. The result of my investigations may be summed up as follows : — THE EXPERIMENTAL SECTION OF THE MEIGS ELEVATED RAILWAY NOW IN USE AT -EAST...
Page 13 - In view, however, of the imperative necessity for the best class of design and construction in everything appertaining to an elevated railway, I think it would be wise for the State of Massachusetts, through its Board of Railroad Commissioners, or otherwise, to regulate the strength and design of 1 These words meet the exact requirements of the law.
Page 11 - ... observer, is one of extreme instability. But upon investigation and practical test this appearance is found to be deceptive. Careful mathematical and mechanical analysis of the arrangement of the wheels and axles shows the plan to be theoretically correct, AND THAT, AS A MATTER OF FACT, THIS ARRANGEMENT OF TRUCKS, UPON PROPERLY CONSTRUCTED GIRDERS, IS MORE STABLE AND MORE SAFE THAN THE TRUCKS OF ORDINARY ROLLING-STOCK UPON THE ORDINARY RAILROAD TRACKS. For the purpose of testing the safety of...
Page 9 - ... of ordinary steam railways. A cylindrical shape has been adopted for all the equipment, for which shape peculiar advantages are claimed as to safety, convenience and economy, and particularly as to offering less resistant surface to the wind. The car is more elegant and commodious internally than ordinary cars, and being largely built of metal, instead of wood, is safer as regards fire, or as regards splinters in case of accident. The turntable arrangement of the trucks also seems stronger and...
Page 10 - ... top boom of the girder, on which it would slide or rest. The wheels that bear the weight, instead of being placed in the ordinary upright position, are fixed at an angle of about 45 degrees from the vertical plane ; the bearingface of the wheels being grooved to fit down upon the angle iron supporting-rail on the upper corners of the lower boom of the track girder, so as to bear both downward and inward on the rail. Each wheel has its own independent axle securely fixed in the iron jaw of the...
Page 11 - ... the first appearance of the rolling-stock to a casual observer, is one of extreme instability. But upon investigation and practical test, this appearance is found to be deceptive. Careful mathematical and mechanical analysis of the arrangement of the wheels and axles shows the plan to be theoretically correct ; and that, as a matter of fact, this arrangement of trucks, upon properly constructed girders, is more stable and safer, than the trucks of ordinary rolling-stock upon the ordinary railroad...
Page 12 - ... jaws held the car effectually in horizontal position with very little strain. Apparently a derailed car, on this system, could not tip over ; which cannot be said of ordinary railroad cars on the ordinary railroad tracks. The locomotive has some minor novelties of construction besides the truck arrangement above alluded to, not necessary here to describe ; but its main features are, the horizontal...
Page 13 - The rolling-stock and motive-power used thereon are also strong and safe for their intended use, no breakage having occurred, or being likely to occur, that could imperil personal safety, either in or out of the cars. A line of railway, properly constructed on this principle, for passenger or freight traffic, and equipped with such rolling-stock and motive-power, on this principle, as the Meigs Company is now prepared to perfect and build, would, in my opinion, be, at least, as strong and safe for...
Page 12 - ... on the rails of the upper boom of the girder, and the hydraulic attachment by which the pressure or adhesion of these driving-wheels upon the rails is created, maintained, and regulated at will by the engine-driver. This motor has accomplished some remarkable feats. It draws itself and the attached train, with apparent ease and at great speed, around sharper curves and up heavier grades than the ordinary locomotive can pass.
Page 10 - ... to use sharper curves in the track than have ever before been practicable. Each truck has also two horizontal guide-wheels, bearing against the rails on the sides of the upper boom of the track girder, to prevent the truck from swaying. As the sustaining rails of the track on the lower boom of the girder are but twenty-two and one-half inches gauge, and the wheels stand sloping outward from these rails, on an angle of about 45, the first appearance of the rolling-stock to a casual observer,...

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