The Menopause Sourcebook, Third Edition

Front Cover
McGraw Hill Professional, Aug 14, 2001 - Health & Fitness - 224 pages

Must-have resource for menopausal and premenopausal women

If you are menopausal or premenopausal, this thoroughly updated and revised guide to the physical, mental, and emotional changes and symptoms that accompany menopause is for you. The Menopause Sourcebook includes an extensive resource list, an honest look at hormone replacement therapy, and dietary and lifestyle recommendations to make your menopausal transition easier. Includes a foreword by Paul G. Stumpf, M.D.

"A fine examination that provides the latest up-to-date details on handling menopause."

--Booklist

 

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Contents

Information Gathering
1
Where Do You Stand?
19
Is This It? The Signs and Symptoms of Menopause
43
Managing Your Symptoms
59
Sex During and After Menopause
93
Should You Be Worried?
111
Menopause and Emotional Stress
139
Integrating Change and Exploring Opportunity
155
CalciumRich Foods
161
Comparison of Calcium Supplements
165
Dietary Recommendations for Health
167
Height and Weight Table
173
Glossary
175
Bibliography
185
Index
189
Copyright

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Page 148 - Wife begins or stops work 26 27 Begin or end school 26 28 Change in living conditions 25 29 Revision of personal habits 24 30 Trouble with boss 23 31 Change in work hours or conditions 20 32 Change in residence 20 33 Change in schools 20 34 Change in recreation 19 35 Change in church activities 19 36 Change in social activities 18 37...
Page 148 - Business readjustment 39 16 Change in financial state 38 17 Death of close friend 37 18 Change to different line of work 36 19 Change in number of arguments with spouse 35 20...
Page 33 - Place your right arm behind your head. 2. Use the finger pads of your three middle fingers on your left hand to feel for lumps or thickening. Your finger pads are the top third of each finger. 3. Press firmly enough to know how your breast feels. If you're not sure how hard to press, ask your health care provider. Or try to copy the way your health care provider uses the finger pads during a breast exam. Learn what your breast feels like most of the time. A firm ridge in the lower curve of each breast...
Page 33 - You can choose either the circle (A), the up and down line (B), or the wedge (C). Do it the same way every time. It will help you to make sure that you've gone over the entire breast area, and to remember how your breast feels each month.
Page 33 - Ue down and put a pillow under your right shoulder. Place your right arm behind your head. 2. Use the finger pads of your three middle fingers on your left hand to feel for lumps or thickening. Your finger pads are the top third of each finger, 3- Press firmly enough to know how your breast feels If you're not sure how hard to press, ask your health care provider. Or try to copy the way your health care provider uses the finger pads during a breast exam. Learn what your breast feels like most of...
Page 3 - NHLBI in cooperation with the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA).
Page 148 - Personal injury or illness 52 7 Marriage 50 8 Fired from work 47 9 Marital reconciliation 45 10 Retirement 45 11 Change in family member's health 44 12 Pregnancy 40 13 Sex difficulties 39 14 Addition to family 39 15 Business readjustment 39 16 Change in financial status 38 17 Death of a close friend 37 18 Change to...
Page 148 - Divorce 73 3. Marital separation 65 4. Jail term 63 5. Death of close family member 63 6. Personal injury or illness 53 7. Marriage 50 8. Fired at work 47 9. Marital reconciliation 45 10. Retirement 45 1 1 . Change in health of family member 44 12. Pregnancy 40 13.
Page 33 - Used by permission. tħO\V to do breast self-exam 1. Lie down and put a pillow under your right shoulder. Place your right arm behind your head. 2. Use the finger pads of your three middle fingers on your left hand to feel for lumps or thickening. Your finger pads are the top third of each finger.
Page xxi - Office of Research on Women's Health at the National Institutes of Health.

About the author (2001)

Gretchen Henkel is a health and medical writer specializing in women's health issues.

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