The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650–1815

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 1, 2010 - History
3 Reviews
An acclaimed book and widely acknowledged classic, The Middle Ground steps outside the simple stories of Indian-white relations – stories of conquest and assimilation and stories of cultural persistence. It is, instead, about a search for accommodation and common meaning. It tells how Europeans and Indians met, regarding each other as alien, as other, as virtually nonhuman, and how between 1650 and 1815 they constructed a common, mutually comprehensible world in the region around the Great Lakes that the French called pays d'en haut. Here the older worlds of the Algonquians and of various Europeans overlapped, and their mixture created new systems of meaning and of exchange. Finally, the book tells of the breakdown of accommodation and common meanings and the re-creation of the Indians as alien and exotic. First published in 1991, the 20th anniversary edition includes a new preface by the author examining the impact and legacy of this study.
 

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User Review  - ScoutJ - LibraryThing

Much of American history presents the view of Native Americans as the conquered peoples in a linear story that begins with the landing of Columbus in the Caribbean and ends with the Trail of Tears and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bfertig - LibraryThing

Slogged my way through The middle ground to finally finish it and post a 977 for the Dewey Decimal Challenge. This was an interesting book, and actually many parts of it read very quickly, provided I ... Read full review

Contents

a world made of fragments
1
The middle ground
50
The fur trade
94
The alliance
142
Republicans and rebels
186
The clash of empires
223
Pontiac and the restoration of the middle ground
269
The British alliance
315
The contest of villagers
366
Confederacies
413
The politics of benevolence
469
Assimilation and otherness
518
Index
525
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Richard White holds the Margaret Byrne Professorship in American History at Stanford University and is widely regarded as one of the nation's leading scholars in three related fields: the American West, Native American history and environmental history. Professor White is the author of five books. The first edition of The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650–1815 (1991) was named a finalist for the 1992 Pulitzer Prize. Among other honors, he is the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation fellowship.

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