The "million Dollar Inmate": The Financial and Social Burden of Nonviolent Offenders

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Lexington Books, 2007 - Social Science - 241 pages
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What kinds of beliefs do most Americans hold about crime and violence, and where do these beliefs come from? What kinds of people are sent to prison are the average inmates dangerous criminals, or are they involved in low-level drug-related, property, or public-order offenses? Who is ultimately paying for their time in prison? The "Million Dollar Inmate" highlights the financial and social costs of America's incarceration of non-violent offenders. With its focus on the specific population of non-violent offenders, this book provides a unique, sociological approach to the problem of handling such a large population at such tremendous costs paid, for the most part, by taxpayers. Basing her insight on extensive research into the origins of America's correctional systems, the visible and non-visible costs incurred by the practice of incarcerating nonviolent offenders, and the goals of the prison system, Heather Ahn-Redding dares to expose flaws in current correctional practices and suggest ways they can be not only changed but also re-envisioned. Ideally suited to researchers, advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and policymakers."
 

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Contents

An Introduction to the Million Dollar Inmate
3
RunOn Sentences
17
A Sentence Is a SentencePeriod
27
Prison Conditions
49
The Financial Costs of Incarceration
69
Expensive Prisoners
93
Can We Have Our Just Desert and Eat It Too?
133
If We Lock Them
141
Some Specifics on Deterrence in General
151
Conclusion
171
Policy Recommendations
181
References
201
Index 233
212
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Heather Ahn-Redding is assistant professor at High Point University.

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