The Mining and Smelting Magazine, Volume 6

Front Cover
The Office, 1864 - Metallurgy
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Page 208 - FBS, who finds that the quantity of solid matter is so great as to exceed by more than four times the proportion of that yielded by the Bath waters. Its composition is also in many respects very different ; for it contains but little sulphate of lime, and is almost free from the salts of magnesium. It is rich in the chlorides of calcium and sodium, and it contains one of the new metals — caesium, never before detected in any mineral spring in England : but its peculiar characteristic is the extraordinary...
Page 209 - ... Miller has scarcely been able to detect any sulphuric acid in the water, and a minute trace only of iron and copper in solution. " When we compare the temperature of the Bath springs, which issue at a level of less than 100 feet above the sea, with the...
Page 209 - ... levels on each side of the lode. The almost entire absence of magnesium raises an obvious objection to the hypothesis of this spring deriving its waters from the sea ; or if such a source be suggested for the salt and other marine products, we should be under the necessity of supposing the magnesium to be left behind in combination with some of the elements of the decomposed and altered rocks through which the thermal waters may have passed. Hot springs are, for the most part, charged with alkaline...
Page 212 - Huttonian doctrine as to the intensity of heat which the production of the unstratified rocks, those of the plutonic class especially implies. The exact nature of the chemical changes which hydrothermal action may effect in the earth's interior will long remain obscure to us, because the regions where they take place are inaccessible to man...
Page 210 - J allude to the metamorphism of sedimentary rocks. Strata of various ages, many of them once full of organic remains, have been rendered partially or wholly crystalline. It is admitted, on all hands, that heat has been instrumental in bringing about this re-arrangement of particles, which, when the metamorphism has been carried out to its fullest extent, obliterates all trace of the imbedded fossils.
Page 208 - Cornish hot spring this metal constitutes no less than a twen'y-sixth part of the whole of the solid contents, which, as before stated, are so voluminous. When Professor Miller exposed some of these contents to the test of spectrum analysis, he gave me an opportunity of seeing the beautiful bright crimson line which the lithium produces in the spectrum.
Page 210 - ... trace of the imbedded fossils. But as mountain-masses many miles in length and breadth, and several thousands of feet in height, have undergone such alteration, it has always been difficult to explain in what manner an amount of heat capable of so entirely changing the molecular condition of sedimentary masses could have come into play without utterly annihilating every sign of stratification, as well as of organic structure. Various experiments have led to the conclusion that the minerals which...
Page 206 - When there, it may be subjected to deoxidating processes, so that the nitrogen, being left in a free state, may be driven upwards by the expansive force of heat and steam, or by hydrostatic pressure. This theory has been very generally adopted, as best accounting for the constant disengagement of large bodies of nitrogen, even where the rocks through which the spring rises are crystalline and unfossiliferous. It will, however, of course be admitted, as Prof.
Page 216 - Enough, however, have been found to justify the assertion that the sedimentary portion of the great metalliferous belt of the Pacific coast of North America is chiefly made up of rocks of Jurassic and Triassic age, with a comparatively small development of carboniferous limestone...
Page 210 - If, therefore, large bodies of hot water permeate mountain-masses at great depths, they may in the course of ages superinduce in them a crystalline structure ; and in some cases strata in a lower position and of older date may be comparatively unaltered, retaining their fossil remains undefaced, while newer rocks are rendered metamorphic. This may happen where the waters, after passing upwards for thousands of feet, meet with some obstruction, as in the case of the Wheat Clifford spring, causing...

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