The Minnesota Horticulturist: Annual report of the Minnesota State Horticultural Society, Volume 28

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Minnesota State Horticultural Society, 1900 - Gardening
 

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Page 456 - And this our life, exempt from public haunt, Finds tongues in trees, books in running brooks, Sermons in stones, and good in everything.
Page 261 - Father, thy hand Hath reared these venerable columns, thou Didst weave this verdant roof. Thou didst look down Upon the naked earth, and, forthwith, rose All these fair ranks of trees. They, in thy sun, Budded, and shook their green leaves in thy breeze, And shot towards heaven. The century-living crow, Whose birth was in their tops, grew old and died Among their branches, till, at last, they stood, As now they stand, massy, and tall, and dark, Fit shrine for humble worshipper to hold Communion with...
Page 259 - Red the full Pomegranate glows, The Branch here bends beneath the weighty Pear, And verdant Olives flourish round the Year. The balmy Spirit of the Western Gale Eternal breathes on Fruits untaught to fail: Each dropping Pear a following Pear supplies, On Apples Apples, Figs on Figs arise: The same mild Season gives the Blooms to blow, The Buds to harden, and the Fruits to grow. Here order'd Vines in equal Ranks appear With all th...
Page 342 - from the cedar of Lebanon, to the hyssop that springeth out of the wall ;" that is, from the greatest to the least.
Page 260 - Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, Hath not old custom made this life more sweet Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference, as the icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's wind, Which, when it bites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say ' This is no flattery : these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am.
Page 261 - Come, let us plant the apple-tree. Cleave the tough greensward with the spade; Wide let its hollow bed be made; There gently lay the roots, and there Sift the dark mould with kindly care, And press it o'er them tenderly, As, round the sleeping infant's feet, We softly fold the cradle-sheet; So plant we the apple-tree.
Page 258 - Which unveiled the depth of her glowing breast, Till, fold after fold, to the fainting air The soul of her beauty and love lay bare...
Page 262 - ... adopted him. Rude as he was, her voice may not always have been meaningless for one who knew her haunts so well ; deep recesses where, veiled in foliage, some wild shy rivulet steals with timid music through breathless caves of verdure ; gulfs where feathered crags rise like castle walls, where the noonday sun pierces with keen rays athwart the torrent, and the mossed arms of fallen pines cast wavering shadows on the illumined foam ; pools of liquid crystal turned emerald in the reflected green...
Page 457 - He saw twice as much as most people do out of 1 We regard this sentence as the most discriminating remark concerning Bushnell that we have ever seen. doors, took a mental survey of all land surfaces, and kept in his head a complete map of the physical geography of every place with which he was acquainted. He knew the leaf and bark of every tree and shrub that grows in New England ; estimated the water power of every stream he crossed ; knew where...
Page 3 - Honorary members for the time stated, or for life, may be elected at any annual meeting by a two-thirds vote of the members present, provided that the name proposed for this purpose shall be first referred to the executive board. Every member shall be entitled to one copy of the transactions, postpaid, as often as published. No member shall vote on any proposed amendment to the constitution or by-laws or at any election of officers except those who have been members for not less than two consecutive...

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